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" The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right... "
Proposed Investigation of the Motion-picture Industry - Page 57
by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary - 1922 - 64 pages
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From Grunts to Gigabytes: Communications and Society

Dan Mabry Lacy - Communication - 1996 - 193 pages
...eighteenth century: "The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity" (quoted in Freedom of the Press from Zenger to Jefferson, ed. Levy, 104, emphasis in the original)....
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Seasoned Judgments: American Constitution, Rights and History

Leonard W. Levy - Constitutional history - 1995 - 444 pages
...infringed or violated. The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. . . . But to punish (as the law does at present) any dangerous or offensive writings, which, when published,...
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Main Themes in the Debate Over Property Rights, Volume 6

James W. Ely - History - 1997 - 444 pages
...upon publications, and in freedom from censure from criminal matter when published. Every free man has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases...illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity.i55 Holmes interpreted the First Amendment on the basis of the common law definition of free...
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A Journalism Reader

Michael Bromley, Tom O'Malley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1997 - 394 pages
...This is nearly equivalent to the general permission of Directorial law. The learned author proceeds - 'But if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temeritv.' Now, where are we to look for authentic definition of these important...
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Press and Speech Freedoms in the World, from Antiquity Until 1998: A Chronology

Louis Edward Ingelhart - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1998 - 307 pages
...scurrilous works since such law would destroy all learning and "root up the com and the tares together." 4) Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser is to subject all freedom of sentiment...
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Landmark Supreme Court Cases: A Reference Guide

Donald E. Lively - Law - 1999 - 374 pages
...was not necessarily without consequence. Citing Blackstone directly, the Court observed that "[ejvery freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity." Put simply, it may not be permissible to deny a person the opportunity...
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Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court: The Defining Cases

Terry Eastland - Law - 2000 - 397 pages
...compiler of English law, who was a major influence in eighteenth-century America. Blackstone wrote that freedom of the press consists in laying no previous...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. Thus, the will of individuals is still left free: the abuse only of that free will is the object of...
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Free Speech, The People's Darling Privilege: Struggles for Freedom of ...

Michael Kent Curtis - History - 2000 - 520 pages
...infringed or violated. The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state: but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. Blackstone explained that in "their largest and most extensive sense,"...
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The American Constitutional Experience: Selected Readings & Supreme Court ...

Richard M Battistoni - Constitutional law - 2000 - 175 pages
...by Blackstone: The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. The distinction was early pointed out between the extent of the freedom...
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Conscience, Expression, and Privacy

Kermit L. Hall - Law - 2000 - 424 pages
...to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraint upon publication, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. 37 Thus the governmental method for controlling the press evolved...
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