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" The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right... "
Proposed Investigation of the Motion-picture Industry - Page 57
by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary - 1922 - 64 pages
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 2

William Blackstone, George Sharswood - Law - 1876
...criminal matter when published. EvL J ery freeman lias an undoubted right to lay what sentiments lie pleases before the public; to forbid this, is to destroy...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consethe offence; and the court of king's bench has laid down this general rule, viz. that it will...
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The History of the United States of America, Volume 5

Richard Hildreth - United States - 1879
...not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted 1797. right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the...mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his temerity. To punish dangerous and offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial...
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The History of the United States of America, Volume 4

Richard Hildreth - United States - 1879
...not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted 1797. right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the...mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his temerity. To punish dangerous and offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial...
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The History of the United States of America, Volume 5

Richard Hildreth - United States - 1879
...criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted 1797. right to lay what sentiments ho pleases before the public ; to forbid this is to destroy...mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his temerity. To punish dangerous and offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial...
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The Prose Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume 1

Percy Bysshe Shelley - English fiction - 1880
...crown, and by virtue of what are called ex-officio informations. Blackstone says, that "if a person publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity;" and Lord Chief Baron Comyns defines libel as " a contumely, or reproach, published to the defamation...
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The Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley in Verse and Prose, how First ..., Volume 5

Percy Bysshe Shelley - 1880
...crown, and by virtue of what are called ex-officio informations. Blackstone says, that " if a person publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity ; " and Lord Chief Baron Comyns defines libel as " a contumely, or reproach, published to the defamation...
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The Science of Government in Connection with American Institutions

Joseph Alden - United States - 1886 - 304 pages
...existence of a free government. An eminent jurist ^as remarked that freedom of the press consists in not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when...he must take the consequences of his own temerity." "To censure the licentiousness is to maintain the liberty of the press." Chancellor Kent remarks :...
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Prose Works, Volume 1

Percy Bysshe Shelley - 1888
...Crown, and by virtue of what are called ex officio informations. Blackstone says, that " if a person publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity." And Lord Chief Baron Comyns defines libel as " a contumely, or reproach, published to the defamation...
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The Prose Works, from the Original Editions, Volume 1

Percy Bysshe Shelley - 1888
...Crown, and by virtue of what are called ex officio informations. Blackstone says, that "if a person publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity." And Lord Chief Baron Comyns defines libel as " a contumely, or reproach, published to the defamation...
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The American and English Encyclopedia of Law, Volume 13

John Houston Merrill, Charles Frederic Williams, Thomas Johnson Michie, David Shephard Garland - Law - 1890
...writings intended for the press, but are confined to those actually printed." DeLorme, Const. 254. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licensor, as was formerly done (to 1694), is to...
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