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" The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right... "
Proposed Investigation of the Motion-picture Industry - Page 57
by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary - 1922 - 64 pages
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The New-York Review, Volume 3

Francis Lister Hawks, Caleb Sprague Henry, Joseph Green Cogswell - American periodicals - 1838
...nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no 'previous restraints upon publications—and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was...
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Commentaries on the Constitution and Laws of England: Incorporated with the ...

Thomas George Western, Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutional law - 1838 - 476 pages
...freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid that, is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he...he must take the consequences of his own temerity." Much, however, may be said, for and against this liberty as it is now exerted. That it has become more...
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The Dublin Review, Volume 7

Nicholas Patrick Wiseman - 1839
...right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public : to forbid this is to destroy the liberty of the press. But if he publishes what is improper,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity." There is, as we have seen, no definition of what is illegal ; and how is it to be determined that the...
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A Familiar Exposition of the Constitution of the United States: Containing a ...

Joseph Story - Constitutional law - 1840 - 372 pages
...liberty of the press, properly understood, is essential to the nature of a free state ; but that this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was formerly done before, and since...
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The oriental rambler, or, The papers of Polyphilus

Polyphilus (pseud.) - 1844
...of which too many are apt to take advantage. Judge Blackstone remarks on the Freedom of the Press, " Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity." In foreign lands especially those which are subject to British power,...
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State Trials of the United States During the Administrations of Washington ...

Francis Wharton - Trials - 1849 - 727 pages
...as follows : " The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state. And this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was...
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The Virginia Report of 1799-1800: Touching the Alien and Sedition Laws ...

Virginia. General Assembly. House of Delegates - Alien and Sedition laws, 1798 - 1850 - 264 pages
...the press. "The liberty of the press is, indeed, essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications,...improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was...
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The History of the United States of America, Volume 5

Richard Hildreth - United States - 1851
...indeed essential to the nature of a free state, but this consists in laying no previous restraints 1797. upon publications, and not in freedom from censure...mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his temerity. To punish dangerous and offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial...
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An Abridgment of Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England: Intended ...

William Blackstone, Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot - Law - 1853 - 338 pages
...restraint upon publication, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every man has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases...he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To punish any dangerous or offensive writings which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial...
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A Manual of the English Constitution: With a Review of Its Rise, Growth, and ...

David Rowland - Constitutional history - 1859 - 588 pages
...to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laving no previous restraints upon publication, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity. Thus the will of individuals is left free ; the abuse only of that...
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