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Books Books 41 - 50 of 195 on It is not to be considered as the effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not....
" It is not to be considered as the effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls upon Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and fauns... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D. - Page 144
by Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - 1820
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The Six Chief Lives from Johnson's Lives of the Poets: With Macaulay's Life ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1881 - 466 pages
...effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...upon Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and/auns with cloven heel. Where there is leisure for fiction there is little grief. In this poem there...
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The Competitor, Volumes 1-2

...diction is harsh, the rhymes uncertain, and the numbers nnpleasing. ... In this poem there is no natnre, for there is no truth ; there is no art, for there is nothing new.'' Regarding the Sonnets he says, " they deserve not any particular criticism ; for of the best it can...
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Examinations Papers

1884
...together in our chivalry. (d) Dost thou thirst, base Trojan, To have me fold up Parca's fatal web? (e) In this poem there is no nature, for there is no truth ; there is no art, for there is nothing new. 3. Give some account of the works usually published under the name of Caedmon. 4. Give some account...
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Shakespeare as a Dramatic Artist: A Popular Illustration of the Principles ...

Richard Green Moulton - Drama - 1885 - 320 pages
...' ; and of Lycidas, that its diction is harsh, its rhymes uncertain, its numbers unpleasing, that ' in this poem there is no nature for there is no truth, there is no art for there is nothing new,' that it is ' easy, vulgar, and therefore disgusting,' — after which he goes through the different...
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The Fourth Gospel: The Question of Its Origin Stated and Discussed

James Freeman Clarke - Bible - 1886 - 70 pages
...one that ' its diction is harsh, its rhymes uncertain, and its numbers unpleasing'; and of another, ' In this poem there is no nature, for there is no truth.' If, therefore, Milton wrote the shorter poems, he evidently did not write the longer one. Youth is...
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Milton's Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity: L'allegro : Il Penseroso ...

John Milton - 1891 - 172 pages
...effusion of real passion; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells of rough 'satyrs' and 'fawns with cloven heel.' Where there is leisure for fiction, there is little grief." But this criticism...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1892 - 139 pages
...moment of the passion. If passion ' runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions,' if passion ' plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls upon Arethuse and Mincius,' neither does passionT perform such simple acts of literary art as the construction of clear sentences,...
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Shakespeare as a Dramatic Artist: A Popular Illustration of the Principles ...

Richard Green Moulton - Drama - 1893 - 443 pages
...its diction is harsh, its rhymes uncertain, its numbers unpleasing, that ' in this poem ll^^flMjfe nature for there is no truth, there is no art for there is nothing new,' that it is ' easy, vulgar, and therefore disgusting,' — after which he goes through the different...
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Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom

Royal Society of Literature (Great Britain) - English literature - 1895
...and such is everywhere the case. With his treatment of Milton everyone is familiar. In ' Lycidas ' " there is no nature, for there is no truth ; there is no art, for there is nothing new." Its form is " easy, vulgar, and therefore disgusting." " The diction is harsh, the rhymes uncertain, and the numbers...
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A Study of English Prose Writers: A Laboratory Method

John Scott Clark - American literature - 1898 - 879 pages
...effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...there is leisure for fiction there is little grief," — Criticism on Milton's Lycidas. " There are so many competitors for the fame of cleanliness that...
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