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Books Books 51 - 60 of 192 on It is not to be considered as the effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not....
" It is not to be considered as the effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls upon Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and fauns... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D. - Page 144
by Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - 1820
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Studies of a Biographer, Volume 4

Sir Leslie Stephen - Authors, English - 1902
...charm already felt. Johnson, as even Professor Raleigh has to admit, was a little hard upon Lycidas. ' In this poem, there is no nature, for there is no truth. . . . Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has...
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Frames of Mind

Arthur Bingham Walkley - Drama - 1899 - 285 pages
...not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and the ivy, nor calls upon Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells- of 'rough satyrs' and 'fauns with cloven heel.' When there is leisure for fiction, there is little grief. . . . Surely no man could have fancied that...
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Practical Composition and Rhetoric

William Edward Mead, Wilbur Fisk Gordy - Composition - 1900 - 372 pages
...effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...Arethuse and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and 'fawns with cloven heel.' Where there is leisure for fiction there is little truth." 1 (Argument?)...
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Lives of Milton and Addison

Samuel Johnson, John Wight Duff - English poetry - 1900 - 209 pages
...remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls In this poem there is no nature, for there is no truth; there is ng^ art,Jbr there__js nothing new. Its form is that of a pastoral, — easy, vulgar, and therefore...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 194

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, Sir William Smith, Rowland Edmund Prothero Baron Ernle, Sir John Murray IV, George Walter Prothero - 1901
...already felt. Johnson, as even Professor Raleigh has to admit, was a little hard upon ' Lycidas.' ' In this poem, there is no nature, for there is no truth. . . . Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 194

1901
...already felt. Johnson, as even Professor Raleigh has to admit, was a little hard upon ' Lycidas.' ' In this poem, there is no nature, for there is no truth. . . . Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has...
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Milton's Lycidas

John Milton - 1902 - 112 pages
...effusion of real passion, for passion runs not after remote allusions afid obscure ^pinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...of rough satyrs and fauns with cloven heel. Where _there is leisure for fiction there is little grief. F " In this poem there is no nature, for there...
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Elementary Guide to Literary Criticism

Franklin Verzelius Newton Painter - Criticism - 1903 - 195 pages
...allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls upon Arthur and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and " fauns...there' is leisure for fiction, there is little grief. SAMUEL JOHNSON. EMERSON And, in truth, one of the legitimate poets Emerson, in my opinion, is not....
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Correct Writing and Speaking

Mary Augusta Jordan - English language - 1904 - 252 pages
...allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls upon Arthur and Mincius, nor tells of rough satyrs and fauns with...there is leisure for fiction, there is little grief." This prejudice was voiced dramatically by Shakespeare in Antony's assertion that he was no orator but...
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Lives of the English Poets: Cowley-Dryden

Samuel Johnson, Harold Spencer Scott - English poetry - 1905
...effusion of real passion ; for passion runs not after remote allusions and obscure opinions. Passion plucks no berries from the myrtle and ivy, nor calls...tells of ' rough satyrs and fauns with cloven heel V ' Where there is leisure for fiction there is little grief4.'In this poem there is no nature, for...
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