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Books Books 1 - 10 of 41 on Walden, that there is no one in Concord with whom he could talk of Oriental literature,....
" Walden, that there is no one in Concord with whom he could talk of Oriental literature, though the man was living within two miles of his hut who had introduced him to it This intellectual selfishness becomes sometimes almost painful in reading him. He... "
The North American Review - Page 604
edited by - 1865
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James Russell Lowell - Birds - 1871 - 433 pages
...experience which would supply the material of such, and he makes his own whim the law, his own range the horizon of the universe. He condemns a world, the...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL - 1874
...nature ; he^planted them with all manner of native and foreign seeds, and reaped assiduously. Jfte was not merely solitary, he would be isolated, and...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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James Russell Lowell - 1876 - 433 pages
...spontaneous kind. He discovered nothing. He / thought everything a discovery of his own, from moon| light to the planting of acorns and nuts by squirrels. !...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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James Russell Lowell - Birds - 1879 - 433 pages
...less convincing, the sentimental melancholy of those poems should be conclusive of their modernnesa. He had no artistic power such as controls a great...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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American Literature ; an Historical Sketch, 1620-1880

John Nichol - American literature - 1882 - 472 pages
...squirrels, a discovery of his own. The itch of originality infected and marred even the charm of his style. De Quincey tells us that Wordsworth was impatient when any one else spoke of mountains: so Thoreau wished to leave his name alone at the top of the hill. His works read as if all out of doors...
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American Literature ; an Historical Sketch, 1620-1880

John Nichol - American literature - 1882 - 472 pages
...squirrels, a discovery of his own. The itch of originality infected and marred even the charm of his style. De Quincey tells us that Wordsworth was impatient when any one else spoke of mountains : so Thoreau wished to leave his name alone at the top of the hill. His works read as if all out of...
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James Russell Lowell - 1883
...historic evidence less convincing, the sentimental melancholy of those poems should be conclusive of then- modernness. He had no artistic power such as controls...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, A.M. - 1883
...squirrels. This is a defect in his character, but one of his chief charms as a writer. Everything %rows fresh under his hand. He delved in his mind and nature...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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James Russell Lowell - Birds - 1884 - 433 pages
...a phenomenon early familiar to most country boys. At forty he speaks of the seeding of the pine aa a new discovery, though one should have thought that...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. - And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one...
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James Russell Lowell - Birds - 1885 - 433 pages
...introduced him to it. This intellectual selfishness becomes sometimes almost painful in reading him. Ho lacked that generosity of "communication " which Johnson...impatient when any one else spoke of mountains, as if he had a peculiar property in them. And we can readily understand why it should be so : no one is...
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