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Books Books 41 - 50 of 55 on The appearances of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate his appetite....
" The appearances of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate his appetite of greatness. To paint things as they are, requires a minute attention, and employs the memory rather than the fancy. Milton's delight was to sport in the wide regions... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: Lives of the poets - Page 42
by Samuel Johnson - 1837
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Johnson's Life of Milton, with intr. and notes by F. Ryland

Samuel Johnson - 1894
...which too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance. did not satiate his appetite of greatness, To paint...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Library of the World's Best Literature: A-Z

Charles Dudley Warner, Hamilton Wright Mabie, Lucia Isabella Gilbert Runkle, George Henry Warner, Edward Cornelius Towne - Literature - 1897
...aggravating the dreadful: he therefore chose a subject on which too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance....sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Lives of Milton and Addison

Samuel Johnson, John Wight Duff - English poetry - 1900 - 209 pages
...too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance. 25 The appearances of nature and the occurrences of life...delight was to sport in the wide regions of possibility ; only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence and furnish sentiment and...
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A Study of English and American Poets: A Laboratory Method

John Scott Clark - American poetry - 1900 - 859 pages
...spaciousness which no other poet gives. . . . Whatever he touches swells and towers." — Lowell. " Milton's delight was to sport in the wide regions...sent his faculties out upon discovery into worlds where only imagination can travel. . . . His great excellence is amplitude. . . . He had accustomed...
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The World's Great Masterpieces: History, Biography, Science ..., Volume 12

Literature - 1901
...iiggravating the dreadful: he therefore chose a subject on which too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance....sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Educational Foundations, Volume 17

Education - 1906
...pleasure is required; but it is his peculiar power to astonish. too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance....sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Milton

Samuel Johnson - 1907 - 144 pages
...nature r and .Lbfi orc'ir rp nrf"r of liff, jid not satiate his appetite of greatness. To paint things 5 as they are requires a minute attention, and employs...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and 10 delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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John Milton: Introductions

John Broadbent, Roy Daniells - Literary Criticism - 1973 - 343 pages
...conventional tributes, giving them sinister Satanic undertones: The appearances of nature, and the occurrence of life, did not satiate his appetite of greatness....sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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John Milton: 1732-1801, Volume 2; Volumes 1732-1801

John T. Shawcross - 1995 - 439 pages
...could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance. The appearance of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Coleridge and the Uses of Division

Seamus Perry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 303 pages
...Milton is curiously at home with his divine material ('a subject for which Milton alone was fitted').13 'The appearances of nature and the occurrences of...than the fancy. Milton's delight was to sport in the vvide regions of possibility; reality was a scene too narrow for his mind,' writes Johnson, admiringly...
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