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" The appearances of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate his appetite of greatness. To paint things as they are, requires a minute attention, and employs the memory rather than the fancy. Milton's delight was to sport in the wide regions... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: Lives of the poets - Page 42
by Samuel Johnson - 1837
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: With an Essay on His Life and ..., Volume 2

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - 1846
...too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of ex travagancc. The appearances of nature, and the occurrences of...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination ran travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Paradiso perduto di Milton

John Milton, Domenico Arnaldi - 1852
...no be said; on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance. The appearance of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate...his mind. He sent his faculties out upon discovery iuto worlds where ouly imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish...
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Johnson's Lives of the British poets completed by W. Hazlitt

Samuel Johnson, William Hazlitt - 1854
...aggravating the dreadful : he therefore chose a subject on which too much could not be said ; on which he might tire his fancy, without the censure of extravagance....sent his faculties out upon discovery into worlds where only imagination can travel; and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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The poetical works of John Milton

John Milton - 1855 - 748 pages
...greatness. To paiut tilings as they are requires a minute attention, and employs the memory rallier than the fancy: Milton's delight was to sport in the...sent his faculties out upon discovery into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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general Report on Public Instruction in the lower Provinces of the Bengal ...

JOHN GRAY - 1857
...and between and ^ ? .3. Explain the words 4. Translate the following passages into Bengalee : — " The appearances of nature and the occurrences of life...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence and furnish sentiment...
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The Lives of the English Poets: cowley. Denham. Milton. Butler. Rochester ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1858
...tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance. The appearances of nature, and the occurrences Qf life, did not satiate his appetite of greatness. To...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1864
...his fancy without the censure of extravagance. k Algarotti terms it yigantesca sublimitd Miltoniana. The appearances of nature and the occurrences of life...sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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The literary reader: prose authors, with biogr. notices &c. by H.G. Robinson

Hugh George Robinson - 1867
...aggravating the dreadful: he therefore chose a subject on which too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance....sent his faculties out upon discovery, into worlds where only imagination can travel, and delighted to form new modes of existence, and furnish sentiment...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1892 - 139 pages
...aggravating the dreadful : he therefore chose a subject on which too much could not be said, on which he might tire his fancy without the censure of extravagance....attention, and employs the memory rather than the fancy. Mf1*''"11'" ^p1'ghJLwas to sport in the w'flp rnginna nf-poKtaMLit.y ; reality was a SCCTIfi tw 10...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1893 - 139 pages
...chose a subject on which too much could not '. be said, on which he might tire his fancy without xthe censure of extravagance. The appearances of Nature,...are requires a minute* attention, and employs the ,i( memory rather than the fancy. Milton's delight was to sport in the wide regions of possibility...
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