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" The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues. "
King John ; King Richard II ; King Henry IV, part 1 - Page 512
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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Shakspeare's himself again; or the language of the poet asserted

Andrew Becket - 1815
...common with our earlier wiiters, the mistake was easily made. Shakspeare has the same thought in All's Well. 'The web of our life is of a mingled yarn ; good and ill together.' Or ' wing' may be a misprint for ming, ie mixtuie. The word is common with the earlier writers. Either...
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Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - English drama (Comedy) - 1872 - 196 pages
...unhopeful mastery; and he takes care to provide, withal, the canon whereby he would have him judged: " The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipp'd them not ; and our crimes would despair, if they...
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Illustrations of the Literary History of the Eighteenth Century ..., Volume 2

John Bowyer Nichols - Authors, English - 1817
...&c. To give but a very few instances in a point so well known : All's Well that Ends Well, p. 435 : The Web of our Life is of a mingled Yarn, good and ill together. Othello, p. 585 : I am glad thy father 's dead ; Thy match was mortal to him, and pure grief Shore...
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1818
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair, if they...
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A View of the English Stage: Or, A Series of Dramatic Criticisms

William Hazlitt - Acting - 1818 - 461 pages
...Shakespeare which should be j stuck as a label in the mouths of our beadles and \ whippers-in of morality: "The web of our life is of a. mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would ; be proud if our faults whipped them not : and our crimes j would despair if they...
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The Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1819
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair, it they...
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Select Plays of William Shakespeare: In Six Volumes. With the ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1820
...he being constrained to betake hims'-if to carded ale." Shakspeare has a similar thought in All '3 Well that Ends Well: " The web of our life is of a...together." The original hint for this note I received from Mv. Toilet. Steevens. By carding his state, the King means that his predecessor set his consequence...
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Select Plays of William Shakespeare: In Six Volumes. With the ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1820
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they were...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 16

William Shakespeare - 1821
...— he being constrained to betake himself to carded ale." Shakspeare has a similar thought in All's Well that Ends Well : " The web of our life is of...from Mr. Toilet. STEEVENS. Mr. Steevens very rightly supports the old reading. The word is used by Shelton, in his translation of Don Quixote. The Tinker...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 16

William Shakespeare - 1821
...— he being constrained to betake himself to carded ale." Shakspeare has a similar thought in All's Well that Ends Well: " The web of our life is of a...The original hint for this note I received from Mr. Tollet. STEEVENS. " But mine is such a drench of balderdash, " Such a strange carded cunningness."...
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