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" The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues. "
King John ; King Richard II ; King Henry IV, part 1 - Page 512
by William Shakespeare - 1793
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose ..., Volume 2

1797 - 1120 pages
...twenty to follow myoAn teaching. Men's evil manners' live in brafs; their virtues we write in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together; our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped thtm not ; and our crimes would defpair, if ihsy...
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Works, Containing His Plays and Poems: To which is Added a Glossary, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1797
...his valour hath here acquired for him, ihall at home be encounter'd with a fhame as ample. i LORD. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipp'd them not ; and our crimes would defpair, if they...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose, Volume 2

Vicesimus Knox - English prose literature - 1797
...twenty to follow my own teaching. Men's evil manners live in brafs ; their virtues we write in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together } our virtues would be proud, if pur faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would defpair, if they...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1803
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they...
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The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ...

William Enfield - 1804
...twenty to follow my own teaching. Men's evil manners live in brass ; their virtues we write in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together ; our virtues would be proud , if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair , if they...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - Elocution - 1804 - 225 pages
...twenty to follow my own teaching. Men's evil manners live in brafs ; their virtues we write in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together ; our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would defpair, if they...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1805
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they were...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1805
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they were...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1805
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they were...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1806
...— he being constrained to betake himself to carded ale." Shakspeare has a similar thought in All '* Well that Ends Well: " The web of our life is of a...original hint for this note I received from Mr. Toilet. Sttevens. By carding his state, the King means that his predecessor set his consequence to hazard,...
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