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" MECHANICAL POWERS are certain simple instruments employed in raising greater weights, or overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the... "
A Course of Mathematics: For the Use of Academies, as Well as Private Tuition - Page 154
by Charles Hutton - 1831
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Lectures on Select Subject in Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Pneumatics, Optics ...

James Ferguson - Astronomy - 1839 - 463 pages
...allowances are to be made. 1 he me' The simple machines, usually called mechanical powers, powers, are six in number, viz. the lever, the wheel and axle,...the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screws.0 — They are called mechanical powers, because they help us mechanically to raise weights,...
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A manual for mechanics' institutions

Society for the diffusion of useful knowledge - 1839
...manner at another point, is a machine. The simple machines or mechanical powers are six in number — the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw. These are the elements of all machines, however complicated. See Mcch., Treat. II., Arts. 1—6. In...
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The North American Arithmetic: For Advanced Scholars. part third, Part 3

Frederick Emerson - Arithmetic - 1839 - 288 pages
...overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Jlxle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. The advantage gained by the use of...
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The North American Arithmetic: Part Third, for Advanced Scholars

Frederick Emerson - Arithmetic - 1839 - 288 pages
...overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the Wheel and •lilt, tlie Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. The advantage gained by the use...
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The National Arithmetic, on the Inductive System: Combining the Analytic and ...

Benjamin Greenleaf - Arithmetic - 1839 - 305 pages
...The body which receives motion from another, is called the weight. The mechanical powers are five, the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Screw and the Wedge. LEVER. The lever is a bar, movable about a fixed point, called its fulcrum or...
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A Practical Treatise on Arithmetic: Wherein Every Principle Taught is ...

George Leonard (Jr.) - Arithmetic - 1839 - 347 pages
...SOMETIMES CALLED MECHANICAL POWERS. LESSON 185. There are usually reckoned six simple machines — the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the screw, and the wedge. The force that raises a weight, or overcomes a resistance, is called the power....
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The artillerist's manual, and compendium of infantry exercise

Frederick Augustus Griffiths - 1840
...or overcoming greater resistances than could be effected by the natural strength without them. They are usually accounted Six in number ; viz. : The Lever...; the Inclined Plane ; the Wedge ; and the Screw. Weight, and Power when opposed to each other, signify the body to be moved, and the body that moves...
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The North American Arithmetic: Part Third, for Advanced Scholars

Frederick Emerson - Arithmetic - 1840 - 288 pages
...overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever,...Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. The advantage gained by the use of the mechanical powers, does not consist in any increase of the quantum...
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The Christian philosopher

Thomas Dick - 1840
...machines, the principles on which their energy depends ; the properties of the mechanical powers — the lever, the wheel, and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge and the screw — and the effects resulting from their various combinations. From the investigations of philosophers...
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The Penny Mechanic, and the Chemist, Volume 2

1837
...lever, the cord, and the inclined plane. They have been, however, differently enumerated by others ; viz., the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge and the screw, being six in number. The first class in eludes every machine which is composed of a solid body revolving...
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