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" MECHANICAL POWERS are certain simple instruments employed in raising greater weights, or overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the... "
A Course of Mathematics: For the Use of Academies, as Well as Private Tuition - Page 154
by Charles Hutton - 1831
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Library of Useful Knowledge: Natural Philosophy...

Physics - 1832
...instruments or elements of which every machine, however complicated, must be constructed : they are the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wdlge, and the Serete. MELTING POINT. That point of the thermometer which indicates the heat at which...
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A million of facts

sir Richard Phillips - 1832
...and La Grange. The mechanical powers may be reduced to three, but they are usually expressed as six, the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the screw, and the wedge. In a single movable pulley the power gained is doubled. In a continned combination...
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Mechanics for Practical Men: Containing Explanations of the Principles of ...

James Hann, Isaac Dodds - Mechanics - 1833 - 208 pages
...to sustain a great weight, or overcome a great resistance, by a small force. The mechanical powers are usually accounted six in number, viz. the Lever,...Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. i THE LEVEE. 35.- A Lever is an inflexible rod, moveable about a certtre of motion, or fulcrum, and...
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The millwright & engineer's pocket companion

William Templeton (engineer.) - 1833
...help of the machine. The simple machines, usually called mechanic powers, are six in number, namely, the Lever, the "Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. There are three kinds of levers, caused by the different situations of the weights, props, and powers....
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On the Improvement of Society by the Diffusion of Knowledge: Or, An ...

Thomas Dick - Education - 1833 - 542 pages
...of a few bars of thin iron ?" And when we consider that all the mechanical powers may be reduced to the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the * Lord Brougham. wedge and the screw, how astonishing are the forces exerted, and the effects produced,...
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The North American Arithmetic: for advanced scholars. Part third

Frederick Emerson - Arithmetic - 1834 - 288 pages
...overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever,...Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw. The advantage gained by the use of the mechanical powers, does not consist in any increase of the quantum...
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Mathematics for Practical Men: Being a Common-place Book of Principles ...

Olinthus Gregory - Mathematics - 1834 - 427 pages
...indeed, are often employed separately, are called Mechanical Powers. Z. Of these we usually reckon six : viz. the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw. To these, however, is sometimes added the funicular machine, being that which is formed by the action...
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The Monthly Repository and Library of Entertaining Knowledge, Volume 4

1834
...machines, the principles on which their energy depends ; the properties of the mechanical powers—the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge and the screw—and the effects resulting from their various combinations. From the investigations of philosophers...
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Lectures on Popular Education: Delivered to the Edinburgh Association for ...

George Combe - Education - 1834 - 130 pages
...bodies. Cohesive attraction. Capillary attraction. Gravitation. Laws of motion. Mechanical powers. The lever. The wheel and axle. The pulley. The inclined plane. The wedge. The screw. Mechanical properties of fluids. Specific gravity. Mechanical properties of air. On the...
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The Elements of Mechanics: Comprehending Statics and Dynamics. With a ...

John Radford Young - Mechanics, Analytic - 1834 - 258 pages
...parts of all machinery are called the mechanical powers. These are six in number, and are as follow : the Lever, the Wheel and axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Screw, and the Wedge. The Lever (75.) A lever is a rigid bar or rod, moveable about a fixed point or...
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