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" MECHANICAL POWERS are certain simple instruments employed in raising greater weights, or overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the... "
A Course of Mathematics: For the Use of Academies, as Well as Private Tuition - Page 154
by Charles Hutton - 1831
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Systematic Education: Or Elementary Instruction in the Various ..., Volume 2

William Shepherd, Jeremiah Joyce, Lant Carpenter - Education - 1815
...hundred different elementary works, the student goes on to the consideration of the mechanical powers, viz. the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw; since to these simple machines, all others, however complicated, may be reduced : we shall here describe...
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The Principles of Mechanics: Designed for the Use of Students in the University

James Wood - Mechanics - 1818 - 210 pages
...and by the combination of which, all machines, however complicated, are constructed. These powers are six in number, viz. the lever ; the wheel and axle...; the inclined plane ; the wedge ; and the screw. Before we enter upon a particular description of these instruments, and the calculation of their effects,...
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A general view of the sciences and arts, Volume 1

William Jillard Hort - 1822
...POWERS.' The simple machines, or mechanical powers, arc usually accounted to be the six following : — the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw. A lever is an inflexible bar, or rod, moving freely round a point, called its fulcrum, or centre of...
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A Popular Course of Pure and Mixed Mathematics ...: With Tables of ...

Peter Nicholson - Mathematics - 1825 - 372 pages
...and by the combination of which, all machines, however complicated, are constructed. These powers are six in number, viz. the lever, the wheel and axle,...pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw. Before we enter upon a particular description of these instruments and the calculation of their effects,...
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The Operative Mechanic, and British Machinist: Being a Practical Display of ...

John Nicholson - Industries - 1825 - 795 pages
...its origin solely to this cause. OF THE MECHANICAL POWERS. THE mechanical powers are six in number, the LEVER, the WHEEL and AXLE, the PULLEY, the INCLINED PLANE, the WEDGE, and the SCREW. A perfect knowledge and thorough appreciation of which should be clearly understood by those who purpose...
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Of mechanics and astronomy

Jeremiah Joyce - Science - 1825
...were in vain to expect you to comprehend the principles of mechanics. There are six mechanical powers. The lever; the wheel and axle ; the pulley ; the inclined plane; the wedge; and the screw. Emma. Why are they called mechanical powers ? Father. Because, by their means we are enabled mechanically...
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The Christian Philosopher, Or, The Connection of Science and Philosophy with ...

Thomas Dick - Philosophy and religion - 1826 - 397 pages
...machines, the principles on which their energy depends ; the properties of the mechanical powers — the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the wedge and the screw — and the effects resulting from their various combinations. From the investigations of philosophers...
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A Treatise of Mechanics, Theoretical, Practical, and Descriptive, Volume 1

Olinthus Gregory - Mechanical engineering - 1826
...combined powers are estimated they must be divided in the investigation ; these are in number six, viz. the lever, the wheel and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the screw, and the wedge. These are most commonly known by the name of the mechanical powers. In all these...
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A Compendium of Mechanics; Or; Text Book for Engineers, Mill-wrights ...

Robert Brunton - Mechanical engineering - 1828 - 189 pages
...Powers are the most simple of mechanical applications to increase force, and overcome resistance. They are usually accounted six in number, viz. The LEVER,...and AXLE, — The PULLEY, The INCLINED PLANE, The MECHANICAL POWERS. LEVER. ii To make the principle easily understood, we must suppose the Lever an...
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Scientific Dialogues: Intended for the Instruction and ..., Volume 1

Jeremiah Joyce - Science - 1829
...were in vain to expect you to comprehend the principles of mechanics. There are six mechanical powers. The lever ; the wheel and axle ; the pulley ; the inclined plane ; the wedge; and the screw. Emma. Why are they called mechanical powers? , Father. Because, by their means we are enabled mechanically...
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