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Books Books 111 - 112 of 112 on Raised by thy breath, has quench'd the orb of day? To-morrow he repairs the golden....
" Raised by thy breath, has quench'd the orb of day? To-morrow he repairs the golden flood And warms the nations with redoubled ray. Enough for me : with joy I see The different doom our fates assign: Be thine Despair and sceptred Care, To triumph and to... "
The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature - Page 243
1775
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The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry

John Sitter - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 298 pages
...At the poem's end the bard commits suicide, casting himself into his sublime landscape: "He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height / Deep in the roaring tide he plung'd to endless night" (lines 143-44). Gray's poem is elegiac rather than confrontational. Set firmly in the...
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The Golden Horns: Mythic Imagination and the Nordic Past

John L. Greenway - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 236 pages
...Edward, spoken in the first person by the Bard, and the narrator breaks in to end the poem: "He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height / Deep in the roaring tide he plung'd to endless night." Most of the poem is narrated by the Bard through Gray's handling of the point of view....
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