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" Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect practice : To end the controversy, in a rapture Upon his instrument he plays so swiftly, So many voluntaries, and so quick,... "
The Dramatic Works of John Ford: With an Introduction, and Notes Critical ... - Page xxxiii
by John Ford - 1831 - 347 pages
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Specimens of English Dramatic Poets who Lived about the Time of ..., Volume 2

Charles Lamb - English drama - 1893
...nightingale, did with her various notes Reply to. Some time thus spent, the young man grew at last 30 Into a pretty anger, that a bird, Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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The Broken Heart

John Ford - 1894 - 132 pages
...art Upon his quaking instrument than she, The nightingale, did with her various notes Reply to: ... Some time thus spent, the young man grew at last Into...pretty anger, that a bird, Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850...

James Ford Rhodes - United States - 1895
...Parodi, had not yet begun her witchery." ' In the preceding decade, Fanny Ellsler had revealed that there They were rivals and their mistress, harmony. —...Into a pretty anger, that a bird, 'Whom art had never tuught cliffs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours...
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The Public School Speaker

Francis Warre Cornish - Literature - 1900 - 570 pages
...much easier to believe That such they were, than hope to hear again. Amet. How did the rivals part? Men. You term them rightly ; For they were rivals,...pretty anger, that a bird Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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Early Prose Writings of James Russell Lowell

James Russell Lowell, Edward Everett Hale - 1902 - 248 pages
...and for a sound, Amethus, 't is much easier to believe That such they were, than hope to hear again. Some time thus spent, the young man grew at last Into a petty anger that a bird, Whom art had never taught cliffs, moods, and notes, Should vie with him for...
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Superstitions about Animals

Frank F. Gibson - NATURE - 1904 - 208 pages
...Lovers' Melancholy. Menaphon is describing to Amethus the contest he has seen in a grove at Thessaly : " The young man grew at last Into a pretty anger, that a bird Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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The Music Lovers' Treasury

Helen Philbrook Patten - English poetry - 1905 - 223 pages
...again. Am. How did the rivals part? Men. You term them rightly ; Dilettante Quartette Painting by A. For they were rivals, and their mistress, Harmony....pretty anger, that a bird Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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More Pages from the Day-book of Bethia Hardacre

Ella Fuller Maitland - English literature - 1907 - 249 pages
...to believe That such they were than hope to hear again. Amethus. How did the rivals part ? Menaphon. You term them rightly ; For they were rivals, and...pretty anger, that a bird, Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect...
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English Poetry (1170-1892)

John Matthews Manly - English poetry - 1907 - 580 pages
...much easier to believe That such they were than hope to hear again. AMET. How did the rivals part? MEN. You term them rightly; For they were rivals,...man grew at last Into a pretty anger, that a bird, 133 Whom art had never taught cliffs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study...
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The Poetry of Anne Finch: An Essay in Interpretation

Charles H. Hinnant, Charles J. Hinnant - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 289 pages
...player and nightingale in John Ford's The Lover's Melancholy,26 the lute player is described as growing "at last / Into a pretty anger, that a bird, / Whom art had never taught clefs, moods, or notes, / Should vie with him for mastery" (11. 133-37). The poet's raillery — only...
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