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" Thus thou must do, if thou have it'; And that which rather thou dost fear to do Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear, And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round,... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 52
by William Shakespeare - 1806
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...pour my "spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal. — What is your tidings? Enter an Attendant. Attend. The king comes here to-night....
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The New American Speaker: A Collection of Oratorical and Dramatical Pieces ...

John Celivergos Zachos - Elocution - 1851 - 552 pages
...pour my spirits in thine ear ; And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements....
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...pour my spirits in thine ear ; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round,* Which fate and metaphysical! aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal. What is your tidings ? Enter an ATTENDANT. Attend. The king comes here to-night. Lady M. Thou'rt mad...
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Scholarship examinations of 1846/47 (-1853/54).

Bengal council of educ - 1852
...pour my spirits in thine ear, And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal." n. Carefully compare, and discriminate between, the characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. III. "...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1852
...pour my spirits in thine ear ; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round ,•* Which fate and metaphysical' aid doth seem To have thee crown'd и íthai. — What is your tidings ? Enter an Attendant Attend. The king comes here to-night Lady...
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A Few Notes on Shakespeare, Volume 70

Alexander Dyce - Literary forgeries and mystifications - 1853 - 156 pages
...decidedly right, — that " wind" is one of the worst emendations in Mr. Collier's volume. Act i. sc. 5. " the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal." The words which Shakespeare here applies to a diadem had been previously applied to a ring by Abraham...
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A few notes on Shakespeare, with occasional remarks on the emendations of ...

Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
...decidedly right,—that " wind" is one of the worst emendations in Mr. Collier's volume. Act i. sc. 5. " the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal." The words which Shakespeare here applies to a diadem had been previously applied to a ring by Abraham...
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Shakespeare restored

William Shakespeare - 1853
...pour my spirits in thine ear ; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal. — /. 348. And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone.] This passage,...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...pour my spirits in thine ear ; And chastise '.vitb the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal. — What is your tidings 1 Enter an Attendant. Allen. The King comes here to-night....
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The Miscellaneous Works, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - English literature - 1854
...may pour my spirits in thine ear, And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes (bee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal." This swelling exultation and keen spirit of triumph, this uncontrollable eagerness...
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