Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 31 - 40 of 180 on I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope....
" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays Biographical and Critical: Chiefly on English Poets - Page 43
by David Masson - 1856 - 475 pages
Full view - About this book

Prose Works

John Milton - 1835 - 976 pages
...thoughts, without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing high...
Full view - About this book

Memorials of Mrs. Hemans: With Illustrations of Her Literary ..., Volume 1

Henry Fothergill Chorley - Poets, English - 1836 - 273 pages
...extracted specimens. IT was our divine Milton, who, wisely as forcih.'.y, laid down the principle "that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the best and honorablest things." Often as this golden wisdom has been neglected...
Full view - About this book

Essays and Poems

Jones Very - American essays - 1839 - 175 pages
...those they feel within? Milton gives us the philosophy of Christian epic poets, when he says, " that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing of...
Full view - About this book

American Annals of Education and Instruction, and Journal of ..., Volume 9

Education - 1839
...thoughts without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion ; that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high...
Full view - About this book

The Monthly magazine

Monthly literary register - 1839
...things, he will do well practically to remember what Milton has no less truly than finely said— " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing of...
Full view - About this book

Paradise Lost: With Variorum Notes ... and a Memoir of the Life of Milton ...

John Milton - 1841 - 457 pages
...The following extracts are only portions of his own defence. " I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and most honourable things ; not presuming...
Full view - About this book

Import and Value of the Popular Lecturing of the Day: A Discourse Pronounced ...

Lectures and lecturing - 1842 - 43 pages
...Jove, make thunder, then Noise has apotheosis, and all ears are open ! It is a saying of Milton, that " he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem," that is, as he himself explains, " a composition...
Full view - About this book

People's Edition of the Entire Works of W. E. Channing, Volume 1

William Ellery Channing - Theology - 1843
...usual noblo style — "I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not he frustrate of his hopo to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not. presuming to sing of...
Full view - About this book

The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 18

American literature - 1849
...against vice, and error, and darknesss, in all its forms. He had started with the conviction " that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to he a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorable7 est things ;" and from...
Full view - About this book

The Works of William E. Channing, Volume 1

William Ellery Channing - Theology - 1845
..." I was confirmed," he says, in his usual noble style, — " I was confirmed in this opinion ; that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things; not presuming to sing of high...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF