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" Highness understood too well the sacred principles which seated the House of Brunswick on the throne of Great Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives,... "
Memoirs of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales - Page 204
1808
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The every-day book and table-book; or, Everlasting calendar of ..., Volume 1

William Hone - 1837
...Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, be hiť claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in parliament assembled. On this ground his royal highness said, that he must be permitted to hope that the wisdom and moderation...
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The Every-day Book and Table Book: Or, Everlasting Calendar of ..., Volume 3

William Hone - Great Britain - 1838
...Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, ie hi* rliiint what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in parliament assembled. On this ground his royal highness said, that he must be permitted to hope that the wisdom and moderation...
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The Speeches of the Right Honourable Charles James Fox in the House of ...

Charles James Fox - Great Britain - 1853 - 862 pages
...Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in Parliament nbled.— Parl. Hist. vol. xxvii. p. 678. Sovereign. Personal attachment was no fit ground for public...
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The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of ..., Volume 1

Thomas Erskine May - Constitutional history - 1861
...throne, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives, and their lordships in Parliament assembled." His Eoyal Highness, therefore, deprecated pressing for any decision on that point, — in which the...
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The constitutional history of England, 1760-1860, Volume 1

Thomas Erskine May (baron Farnborough.) - 1861
...throne, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives, and their lordships in Parliament assembled." His Royal Highness, therefore, deprecated pressing for any decision on that point, — in which the...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 77

1863
...throne, ever to assume or exereise any power, be his elaim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in Parliament assembled. He therefore depreeated pressing for any deeision on that point, in whieh the Duke of Gloueester eoneurred/'...
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English constitutional history

Thomas Pitt Taswell- Langmead - 1875
...throne, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in Parliament assembled.'2 A regency bill was introduced in the Commons and sent up to the Lords, but the king's...
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The Life of George the Fourth, Volume 1

Percy Hetherington Fitzgerald - Great Britain - 1881 - 460 pages
...Britain, ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives, and their Lordships in parliament assembled." This address on the part of the young Prince found much favour, both for its matter as well as for...
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The Dublin Review, Volume 89

Nicholas Patrick Wiseman - 1881
...throne ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in Parliament assembled/'-)- And throughout it we find the same homage paid to those "sacred principles," not merely as a rhetorical...
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The Dublin review

1881
...throne ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives and their lordships in Parliament assembled."f And throughout it we find the same homage paid to those "sacred principles," not merely...
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