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" Sweet Swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James... "
Bentley's quarterly review - Page 58
1860
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1844
...lines ; In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Sweet Swan of Avon, what a sight it were, To see thee in our...upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James ! But stay; I see thee in the hemisphere Advanc'd, and made a constellation there : Shine...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 1

John Payne Collier - 1844
...lines ; In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Sweet Swan of Avon, what a sight it were, To see thee in our...flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eli/a, and our James! But stay; I see thee in the hemisphere Advanc'd, and made a constellation there...
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1844
...; for Ben Jonson, in his celebrated eulogy, thus apostrophises his departed friend : — Sweet swan of Avon, what a sight it were, To see thee in our waters yet appear ; And make those nights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza and our James. The latter monarch was present...
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Cyclopædia of English literature, Volume 1

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1844
...of ignorance.' Sweet Swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our water yet appear, •\nd and our James 1 But stay, I see thee in the hemisphere Advanced, and made a constellation there 1 Shine...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 1

1844
...lines ; In each of which he seems to shake a lanee, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignoranee. Swect Swan of Avon, what a sight it were, To see thee in our waters yct appear ; And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James!...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 14

1871
...lifelike reality to which we are strangers. Such briefly were the theatres in which Shakspeare — " Made those flights upon the banks of Thames That so did take Eliza and our James." Such, also, in the dearth of clubs and coffee-houses, of novels, newspapers, and other...
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New Illustrations of the Life, Studies, and Writings of Shakespeare, Volume 2

1845
...Shakespeare the " sweet swan of Avon ;" Sweet swan of Avon 1 what a sight it were To see thee in our water * yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so dirl take Eliza and our James ! The lines occur in the poem entitled " To the memory of my beloved...
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New Illustrations of the Life, Studies, and Writings of Shakespeare, Volume 2

Joseph Hunter - 1845
...amans Genitor. Jonson was the first who called Shakespeare the " sweet swan of Avon;" . Sweet swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our water * yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza and our...
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Études de littérature, ancienne & étrangère

Villemain (M., Abel-François) - Literature - 1846 - 389 pages
...regarding thé works of Shakspeare, from J. Payne Collier. 1836. 1 « Sweet swan of Avon, what a sight il were To see thee in our waters yet appear; And make those flights upon thé banks of Thames, Tbat so did take Mi/», and our James. » Quoique attaqué souvent par les allusions...
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Shakspeare's dramatic art: and his relation to Calderon and Goethe, tr. [by ...

Hermann Ulrici - 1846
...and took great pleasure in his compositions, is proved by Ben Jonson's well-known lines: " Sweet swan of Avon ! what a sight it were, To see thee in our water yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza and our James."*...
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