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Books Books 101 - 110 of 114 on Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me: Safe....
" Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me: Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne, Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone. "
The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art - Page 480
1860
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Selected Poetry

Alexander Pope - Poetry - 1998 - 226 pages
...proud, I am no slave: So impudent, I own myself no knave: So odd, my country's ruin makes me grave. Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid...me: Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne, 210 Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone. O sacred weapon! left for truth's defence, Sole dread...
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Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...Ask you what provocatlon I have had? The strong antipathy of good to bad. 8925 Imitations of Horace girl perba 8926 Light quirks of music, broken and uneven, Make the soul dance upon a jig of heaven. 8927 A man...
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Know Your Mind: The Psychological Dimension of Ethics in Buddhism

Sangharakshita (Bhikshu) - Philosophy - 1998 - 291 pages
...of the local priest? This is the kind of frailty that draws the withering scorn of Alexander Pope: Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God, afraid ofme.')l It is therefore safer not to rely entirely on one's ability to fear the discommendation of...
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What Became of Wystan

...imagine Juvenal, impossible to imagine Horace, saying what Pope says near the end of his epilogue:"! must be proud to see / Men not afraid of God, afraid of me" (701). In making such comments Pope was merely inheriting Dryden's verdict on Horace ("a Temporizing...
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Misogynous Economies: The Business of Literature in Eighteenth-century Britain

Laura Mandell - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
...egotism that strains belief: Ask you what Provocation I have had? The strong Antipathy of Good to Bad. Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God, afraid of me. (lines 197-98, 208-9) The reader begins to realize that, although P. may not write verse to flatter...
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Studies in Criticism and Aest

Howard Anderson - Aesthetics, British - 1999 - 419 pages
...proud, I am no Slave: So impudent, I own myself no Knave: So odd, my Country's Ruin makes me grave. Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God, afraid of me. (11. 205-9) Pope feels he cannot become a friend of those in power, for to do so would necessitate...
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The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots

Joseph Twadell Shipley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 636 pages
...which OE prud, E proud, whence pride. Caustic Alexander Pope exulted in his power: Yes, I am proud, and must be proud, to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me. Lord Herney put him in his place: The mighty honour of that boast is such That hornets and mad dogs...
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The Literature of Satire

Charles A. Knight - Literary Criticism - 2004
...satirist may admit his arrogance, thus seeking to compensate for negative pride by positive frankness: "Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see / Men not afraid of God, afraid of me" (Pope, "Epilogue to the Satires: Dialogue n," lines 208-09). Alternatively, the satirist may create...
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Shakespeare's Heroines

Anna Murphy Jameson - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 464 pages
...something in satire which excites only the lowest and worst of our propensities. That avowal in Pope — I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God, afraid of me!1 — has ever filled me with terror and pity. MEDON. From its truth, perhaps? ALDA. From its arrogance...
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The Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature

Elizabeth Kantor - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 278 pages
...typical of eighteenth-century poetry — one concise and perfectly balanced thought in just two lines): "Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see / Men not afraid of God afraid of me." Pope's Dunciad is a more ambitious MacFlecknoe: Pope takes on not just one ridiculous pretender to...
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