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Books Books 131 - 140 of 140 on Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound : Wherefore should....
" Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound : Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom ; and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen moon-shines Lag of a brother? Why bastard? "
Laocoon; Or The Limits of Poetry and Painting - Page 242
by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing - 1836 - 373 pages
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God's Joust, God's Justice: Law and Religion in the Western Tradition

John Witte - Law - 2006 - 498 pages
...words of Edmund, the scheming bastard, who nonetheless could speak to the injustice of his status: Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen...
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Treacherous Bonds and Laughing Fire: Politics and Religion in Wagner's Ring

Mark Berry - Music - 2006 - 287 pages
...though Shakespeare has society turn Edmund vicious, like ugly Alberich, rather than a mere outlaw: Thou, Nature, art my goddess. To thy law my services are bound. Wherefore should I stand in the plague of custom and permit the curiosity of nations to deprive me for that I am some twelve or fourteen...
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Shakespeare and the Ideal of Love

Jill Line - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 192 pages
...goddess so feared by Lady Macbeth; but the goddess that Edmund calls upon in King Lear is very different: Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. 1.2.1-2 She is the same dark deity invoked by Lady Macbeth. As a natural son, a bastard conceived 'in...
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Shakespeare's Window Into the Soul: The Mystical Wisdom in Shakespeare's ...

Martin Lings - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 224 pages
...blindness, and untruth. Of the four vehicles of these vices, Edmund is the most clear cut. When he says: Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. (1, 2, 1-2) he means that he is determined to adapt the law of the jungle to human life, and to reject...
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X-kit Literature Series: FET King Lear

...a fake letter that shows that Edgar is plotting against him. Edmund's 'bastard' soliloquy 26 Edmund Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, 5 For that I am some twelve or...
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Monologe bei Schiller und Shakespeare

Manuela Kistner - 2007 - 120 pages
...Intrige wie Franz plant. Auch seine Intrige ist gegen den eigenen Bruder gerichtet: Edmund:„Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound Wherefore should I Stand in the plague ofcustom, andpermit The curiosity ofnations to deprive me? For that I am some twelve orfourteen...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare, Burton Raffel, Harold Bloom - Drama - 2007 - 215 pages
...heat = intensely, soon SCENE 2 Gloucester's castle ENTER EDMUND, WITH A LETTER Edmund Thou Nature1 art my goddess, to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand2 in the plague3 of custom, and permit The curiosity4 of nations to deprive me, 5 For that I am...
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'I'll Tell Thee Thou Dost Evil'

Martin Villwock - 2007 - 32 pages
...addressing god, abstract concepts or spirits (Mazzon 1992:133). Thus, Edmund begins his soliloquy saying "Thou, nature, art my goddess; to thy law / My services are bound" (1.2.1). One addresses god (or spirits and powers) in private, in prayer, which makes it available...
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The Tragedy of King Lear: With Classic and Contemporary Criticisms

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 340 pages
...Kent, for instance: It is the stars, The stars above us, govern our condition: (4-3.33—34) Edmund: Thou, nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound: (1.2.1—2) and again, This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune...
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Shakespeare, Love and Service

David Schalkwyk - Literary Criticism - 2008
...repeatedly on being introduced to Kent, and his self-revealing soliloquy opens with a pledge of service: "Thou, nature, art my goddess. To thy law / My services are bound" (1.2.1—2). Barish and Waingrow argue that despite his rhetoric of servile duty, Edmund represents...
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