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Books Books 101 - 110 of 158 on Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound : Wherefore should....
" Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound : Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom ; and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen moon-shines Lag of a brother? Why bastard? "
Laocoon; Or The Limits of Poetry and Painting - Page 242
by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing - 1836 - 373 pages
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Adaptations of Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology of Plays from the ...

Daniel Fischlin, Mark Fortier - Drama - 2000 - 320 pages
...Exchange have got, In vain our Poets Preach, whilst Church-men Plot. Act I (Enter BASTARD solus.) BASTARD Thou Nature art my Goddess, to thy Law My Services are bound, why am I then Depriv'd of a Son's Right because I came not In the dull Road that custom has prescrib'd?...
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Philosophy and political economy in some of their historical relations ...

James Bonar, Roger Backhouse - Economics - 2000 - 424 pages
...Bentham's Anarehical Fallatits ( Whs., vol. ii.), Lewis' Use and Abuse of some Political Terms (1832). 1 " Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound." — Lear, I. n. • Afaebrth, V. i. 79. forces with and on which it works on the other side; and it...
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Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 228 pages
...Vice of the morality plays. As Gloucester's 'natural' son, he decides that he will act 'naturally': Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve of fourteen...
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King Lear, by William Shakespeare

Lloyd Cameron - English literature - 2001 - 102 pages
...'Natural' Edmund may be, but he isn't loyal. When Edmund says, at the beginning of Act I, Scene ii: Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. (lines 1-2) Gloucester is quick to detect any divergence from the natural order and interprets Lear's...
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Vagrancy, Homelessness, and English Renaissance Literature

Linda Woodbridge - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 338 pages
...retainer to GoneriL As Halpern notes, there is much of the feudal about Edmund, whose "opening lines ('Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law / My services are bound') strongly allude to the language of knightly enfeoffment and courtly love, [while] his illegitimate...
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Symplectic Geometry and Mirror Symmetry: Proceedings of the 4th KIAS Annual ...

Kenji Fukaya - Mirror symmetry - 2001 - 508 pages
...then, one begins to suspect that the radical opposition between physis and nomos implicit in Edmund's "Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law my services are bound ..." - the radical contrast he would draw between the laws of Nature and the laws of men - far from...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...by the Earl of Gloucester's illegitimate son, Edmund, who begins a memorable soliloquy as follows: "Thou, Nature, art my goddess, to thy law/ My services are bound" (I, ii, 1-2). Edmund offers tribute to a different divinity, one that embodies a primitive, even bestial...
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Speak What We Feel: Not What We Ought to Say

Frederick Buechner - Religion - 2009 - 176 pages
...Edmund's view is of course directly the opposite. When all by himself with no one to hear him he says, "Thou, Nature, art my goddess; to thy law / My services are bound," he is thinking of Nature simply as the way things are and of its only law as the law of the jungle....
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King Lear: A Guide to the Play

Jay L. Halio - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 128 pages
...Here is a sample of Tale's reworking of Shakespeare's lines, Edmond's opening soliloquy on bastardy: Thou Nature art my Goddess, to thy law My Services are bound, why am I then Depriv'd of a Son's Right, because I came not In the dull Road that custom has prescrib'd?...
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Novel Shakespeares: Twentieth-century Women Novelists and Appropriation

Julie Sanders - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 258 pages
...related stage type), has become almost an essentialist expression of the bastard's theatrical role: Thou, nature, art my goddess; to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen...
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