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" In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets : As stars with trains of fire and dews of blood, Disasters in the sun, and... "
The perennial calendar, and companion to the almanack, revised and ed. [or ... - Page 120
by Thomas Ignatius M. Forster - 1824
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Shakespeare and the Law

Dunbar Plunket Barton - Drama - 1929 - 167 pages
...leaves him (Two Gentlemen of Verona, v. 4), Horatio telling how a little before Csesar's death the Roman graves stood 'tenantless' and 'the sheeted dead did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets' (Hamlet, i. i), and the gravediggers (v. i) coming to the conclusion that no building is more durable...
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Shakespeare and the Editorial Tradition

Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Humanities Stephen Orgel, Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 418 pages
...one other passage, a Q, only speech in 1.2, does Rowe take such a liberty). emending Q's10 puzzling "As stars with trains of fire and dews of blood, / Disasters in the sun" (lines 1 17-18) to read "Stars shon with Trains of Fire, Dews of Blood fell, / Disasters veil'd the...
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The Bomb Vessel

Richard Woodman - Fiction - 2000 - 215 pages
...had an eclipse. Happily it had no effect upon us.' 'Quite so, sir.' Lettsom paused for a moment. ' "The moist star, upon whose influence Neptune's empire stands, Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse . . ." Hamlet, gentlemen, Act One . . .' 'Sick to doomsday with anchoring more like, Bones', put in...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 336 pages
...Onomatopoeia: Using words that are chosen because they mimic the sound of what is being described: 'The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets;' (Act 1 scene 1 line 114, page 11) Pastiche: A piece of writing done in imitation of the form and style...
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Scare Quotes from Shakespeare: Marx, Keynes, and the Language of Reenchantment

Martin Harries - Philosophy - 2000 - 209 pages
...most high and palmy state of Rome, A litde ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood [tenandess] and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets. (Ii112-16) Marcellus's earlier description of the "portentous figure" of the Ghost (Ii1og) and Horatio's...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : the First Folio of 1623 ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 261 pages
...the King That was and is the question of these wars Horatio A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye. In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little...stands, Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse. And even the like precurse of fear'd events, As harbingers preceding still the fates, And prologue...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 405 pages
...trouble the mind's eye" (1.1.115), he recounts, without a trace of disbelief, how In the high and most palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius...stands, Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse. Then, returning to the present, he draws an explicit parallel: And even the like precurse of fear'd...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...Ghosts walked in the City, — not in the Republic. . . . Every hackneyer of this HAMLET [ACTI.SC. i. A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves...; As stars with trains of fire and dews of blood, 115 115. tenantless} tennatliffe QaQ3. and} Om. Pope, Theob. Han. Warb. 116. streets:} Line marked...
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The Tragedie of Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...dead] CAPELL (i, 104) compares: 'Graves yawn, and yield your dead.' — Much Ado, V, iii, 19; and also: 'A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves...dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.' — Hamlet, I, i, 113. — MALONE likewise quotes the foregoing passages. 24. Fierce fiery . . . vpon...
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The Wheel of Fire: Interpretations of Shakespearian Tragedy

George Wilson Knight - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 393 pages
.... . eclipse' to the end. so that his text reads: In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A linle ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless....sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets, And even the like precurse of fierce events, As harhingers preceding still the fates And prologue to...
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