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Books Books 71 - 80 of 180 on Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshend....
" Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshend to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for... "
The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. - Page 55
by Oliver Goldsmith, Thomas Percy, Thomas Campbell - 1809
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Castle Rackrent ; An Essay on Irish Bulls ; an Essay on the Noble Science of ...

Maria Edgeworth - 1832 - 312 pages
...conversation was renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke : " Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton...
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Castle Rackrent: And Irish Bulls

Maria Edgeworth - 1832 - 312 pages
...conversation was renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke : " Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sit, To eat mutton...
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The Georgian Era: The royal family. The pretenders and their adherents ...

Art - 1832
...for mankind ; Tho' fraught with all learning, kept straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still weut on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining. Though equal to all things,...
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Tales and Novels, Volumes 1-2

Maria Edgeworth - 1834
...conversation was renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke: "\Vlio, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining,...thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; In short, 'twas his fate, tinemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat motion cold, and cut blocks with a razor."...
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The Southern literary messenger

...among the greatest was one, who, although it has been said of him that " too deep for his hearers he went on refining, And thought of convincing while they thought of dining," was yet the most splendid orator of modern times, the renowned Edmund Burke. There, too, was Pitt,...
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Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary ..., Volumes 1-2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Criticism - 1834 - 351 pages
...parliamentary auditors, yet the cultivated classes throughout Europe have reason to be thankful that he went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining. Our very sign boards (said an illustrious friend to me) give evidence that there has been a TITIAN...
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Tales and novels, Volume 1

Maria Edgeworth - 1835
...conversation wasf renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke: " Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining,...thought of convincing, while they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemployed or in plaee, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a...
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Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham

Englishmen - 1836
...for mankind ; Tho' fraught with all learning, kept straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers,...disobedient, And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient ; In fine, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in pay, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks...
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The Poetical Works

Oliver Goldsmith - English poetry - 1836 - 118 pages
...mankind ; Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshend J to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers,...disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. Vide page 69. t Ibid, t Mr. T. Towmhend, Memher for Whitchureh. In short, 'twas his fate,...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: With an Account of His Life and ...

Oliver Goldsmith - 1838 - 527 pages
...for mankind. Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshendt to lend him a vote: Who, too deep for his hearers,...disobedient; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks...
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