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Books Books 51 - 60 of 180 on Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshend....
" Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townshend to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for... "
The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. - Page 55
by Oliver Goldsmith, Thomas Percy, Thomas Campbell - 1809
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The Poetical Works of John Milton ...

John Milton - 1824 - 131 pages
...persuade Tommy Townshend* to lend him a vote; [ing, Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on reh'nAnd thought of convincing while they thought of dining...disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks...
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The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 1

Phrenology - 1824
...for mankind. Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat To persuade Tommy Townsend to lend him a vote — Who, too deep for his hearers,...still went on refining, And thought of convincing, when they thought of dining. Though equal to all things — for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman...
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Works, Volume 2

Maria Edgeworth - 1824
...conversation was renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke — " Who too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining, In short 'twas his fate unemployed or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold,...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: Miscellaneous poems. The good ...

Oliver Goldsmith - English literature - 1825
...attorney. 5 Vide page g3. 6 Vide page g3. 7 Mr T. Townshend, member for Whitchurch. RETALIATION. 95 Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining,...disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks...
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The Traveller, the Deserted Village, and Other Poems

Oliver Goldsmith - 1825 - 144 pages
...Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on nfining, And thought of convincing, while they thought o/ dining ; Though equal to all things, for all things...disobedient . And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient.. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place,sir. To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks...
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The Congregational magazine [formerly The London Christian ..., Volume 6

1842
...; that engages the reflecting minority. The liberator of the Hottentots, like the immortal Burke, ' Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining,...thought of convincing, while they thought of dining,' frequently talks an assembly of shallow men into marked and ill-maunered impatience, while discoursing...
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Select Poets of Great Britain: To which are Prefixed, Criticial Notices of ...

William Hazlitt - English poetry - 1825 - 562 pages
...for mankind. Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend n for Thomas Tegg eonvineing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too niee...
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Castle Rackrent. Essay on Irish bulls. The modern Griselda. v. II. Belinda ...

Maria Edgeworth - 1825
...conversation was renewed by the English gentleman's repeating Goldsmith's celebrated lines on Burke — " Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton...
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The Plain Speaker;: Opinions on Books, Men, and Things..

William Hazlitt - Aesthetics - 1826 - 447 pages
...as one who was kept back in his dazzling, wayward career, by the supererogation of his talents — Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit. Dr. Johnson, in Boswell's Life, tells us that the only person whose conversation he ever sought for...
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The Plain Speaker: Opinions on Books, Men, and Things, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - Aesthetics - 1826 - 472 pages
...as one who was kept back in his dazzling, wayward career, by the supererogation of his talents — Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit. Dr. Johnson, in Boswell's Life, tells us that the only person whose conversation he ever sought for...
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