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Books Books 81 - 90 of 137 on Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue....
" Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of... "
The travellers - Page 93
by Tertius T C. Kendrick - 1825
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The Christian Examiner, Volume 73

Edward Everett Hale - 1862
...from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirit*, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Chamber's household edition of the dramatic works of William Shakespeare, ed ...

William Shakespeare - 1862
...no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd 1 No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear 1 Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Discourses of politics

Frances Power Cobbe - Theology - 1863
...with any member who shall rise on this floor and pronounce a panegyric upon the chief magistrate. ' No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.' " Yet the future of Mr. Polk was not so obvious in 1834, as...
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Scraps. [An anthology, ed.] by H. Jenkins

esq Henry Jenkins - 1864
...from thee That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of ...

William Shakespeare, John William Stanhope Hows - Readers - 1864 - 447 pages
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd 1 No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear 7 Since my dear soul was mistress .of her choice,...
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Foliorum silvula, selections for translation into Latin and Greek ..., Volume 2

Hubert Ashton Holden - 1864
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, to feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; and crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Works of Shakespeare, Volume 3

Howard Staunton - 1864
...— *' I'de rather heare a towne bull bellow. Then such a fellow speakc my lines," Sic. N'o, lut tUo candied tongue lick * absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee,4 Where thrift may follow fawning, f Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of herj choice,...
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Shakspeare's tragedy of Hamlet, with notes, extr. from the old 'Historie of ...

William Shakespeare - 1865
...from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Hamlet

1964 - 144 pages
...no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee [Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.] Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice...
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The Cornhill Magazine, Volume 12; Volume 59

William Makepeace Thackeray - England - 1889
...of Hamlet against the new-fashioned heavy drinking prevalent at court, and boldly says — Let tlie candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. If any other proof were wanting of his unrecorded Scotch tour,...
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