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Books Books 71 - 80 of 173 on Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue....
" Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of... "
The travellers - Page 93
by Tertius T C. Kendrick - 1825
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Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of Shakspeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 469 pages
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Shakespeare's Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 272 pages
...That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp , And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my deiir soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams

Josiah Quincy - Presidents - 1858 - 429 pages
...panegyric upon him, or by a rancorous invective on me, he shall never elicit one word of reply from me. ' No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where THRIFT may follow fawning.' " On the 20th of February, 1834, Mr. Adams attended the funeral...
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Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams

Josiah Quincy - Presidents - 1858 - 429 pages
...panegyric upon him, or by a rancorous invective on me, he shall never elicit one word of reply from me. ' No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where THRIFT may follow fawning.' '•' On the 20th of February, 1834, Mr. Adams attended the...
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1858
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, what may have been recited at the time the tragedy was first acted. It is curious because it...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...quarto of 1603. — " I'de rather heare a towne bull bellow. Then euch a fellow speake my lines," tc. rns again into the wor knee/ Where thrift may follow fawning.f Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of herj choice,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, Howard Staunton - 1860
...quarto of 1603, — " 1'de rather heere a towne hull bellow, Ttien such a fellow speake my lines," Are. ou the queen on't. PEE. Sir, my gracious lord, To chide at your extremes, it not be knee,' Where thrift may follow fawning.f Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her i choice,...
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The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton, the illustr. by J ...

William Shakespeare - 1860
...rather heare a towne bull bellow. Then euch и fellon speake my lines," ftc. ACT Ш.] [ВСЕЯВ п. No, let the candied tongue lick* absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee,* Where thrift may follow fawniug.f Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of herj choice,...
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Choice thoughts from Shakspere, by the author of 'The book of familiar ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatterM ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant * hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Shakspeare's tragedy of Julius Csar, with intr. remarks; copious ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...which softens the hearts of fools. 1 Crooked curtsies.] Bendings of the knee. So in Hamlet, iii. 2, ' Let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, and crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, where thrift may follow fawning.' The correction crouched, for crooked, is unnecessary. 2 If...
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