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Books Books 61 - 70 of 174 on Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue....
" Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of... "
The travellers - Page 93
by Tertius T C. Kendrick - 1825
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Speeches, Addresses, and Occasional Sermons, Volume 2

Theodore Parker - Sermons, American - 1852
...with any member who shall rise on this floor and pronounce a panegyric upon the chief magistrate. ' No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.''' Yet the future of Mr. Polk was not so obvious in 1834, as...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a selection of engr ...

William Shakespeare - 1853
...from thee, That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1853
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thce? Why should the poor U flatter'd 7 Y knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear' (4) The meaner people then seem to have sat...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1853 - 575 pages
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant" hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. H. iii. 2. 'Tis holy sport to be a little vain When the sweet...
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Agamemnon the King: a Tragedy: From the Greek of Aeschylus

Aeschylus - 1855 - 226 pages
...from a present Deity, too bright For mortal vision, to conceal their eyes." GLOVER, book iii. p. 60. " No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning." Hamlet, Act III. Sc. 2. In King Lear we have — " Than twenty...
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The Stratford Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight

William Shakespeare - 1856
...That no revenue hast but thy good psirits, To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of my choice,...
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Great Truths by great Authors

1856
...That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd Pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear Soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee,8 Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: According to the Improved Text of Edmund ...

William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone - 1857
...That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp , And crook the pregnant ' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear 1 Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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