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Books Books 41 - 50 of 174 on Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue....
" Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of... "
The travellers - Page 93
by Tertius T C. Kendrick - 1825
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 14

William Shakespeare - 1844
...That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant ' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, Volume 15

United States - 1844
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flattered 1 No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear 1 Since my dear soul vas mistress of her choice,...
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New Illustrations of the Life, Studies, and Writings of Shakespeare, Volume 2

1845
...who seem silently to have withdrawn themselves about the close of the last century. III. 2. HAMLET. No, let the CANDIED tongue lick absurd pomp And crook the PREGNANT hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning. Both these epithets required to be justified, yet it is not easy...
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The Calcutta Review, Volume 7

India - 1847
...especially those who seek to gain protection and advancement, from sensible men, by means of flattery. " No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee. Where thrift may follow fawning." But, on the other hand, perhaps no people in the eastern world...
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The Calcutta Review, Volume 7

India - 1847
...especially tboĢe who seek to gain protection and advancement, from sensible men, by means of flattery. " No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning." But, on the other hand, perhaps no people in the eastern world...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - Azerbaijan - 1847
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thec? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee *, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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THE MIRROR MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

PERCY B. ST. JOHN - 1848
...from thee That no reverence hast but thy good spirits To clothe and feed thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where theft may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1848
...thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be Ham. Nay, do not think I flatter; flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant ' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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A Discourse Delivered in Quincy, March 11, 1848, at the Interment of John ...

William Parsons Lunt - Presidents - 1848 - 61 pages
...with any member who shall rise on this floor and pronounce a panegyric upon the chief magistrate. " No, LET the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where THHIFT may follow fawning." Yet the future of Mr. Polk was not so obvious in 1834, as the...
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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction

Reuben Percy, John Timbs - 1848
...from thee That no reverence hast but thy good spirits To clothe and feed thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the oregnant hinges of the knee Where theft may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was...
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