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Books Books 21 - 30 of 170 on Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue....
" Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of... "
The travellers - Page 93
by Tertius T C. Kendrick - 1825
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: With Glossarial Notes, a Sketch of ...

William Shakespeare - 1825 - 908 pages
...revenue bast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee Т Why should the poor IK flatter'd Т No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant 1 binges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawuiitg. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress...
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Cumberland's British Theatre, with Remarks, Biographical and Critical ...

English drama - 1826
...thee, That no revenue hast, but thy (food spirits, To feed and clothe thee 1 Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice....
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and selected ...

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons - 1826
...no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant 7 hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress...
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The Beauties of Shakspeare Regularly Selected from Each Play. With a General ...

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 345 pages
...That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee? Whv should the poor be flatter'd? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant): hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear-? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery as Applied in Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - Elocution - 1828 - 404 pages
...even on the stage, as in the following passage from Hamlet. — Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, When thrift may follow fawnirg. A certain actor, in repeating these lines, bent the knee, and...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 3

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...works are generally most replete with both. — Goldsmith. CCCLX. Why should the poor be Battered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp; And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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A London Encyclopaedia, Or Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 22

Thomas Curtis - Aeronautics - 1829
...five hundred crowns. The thrift;/ hire I saved under your father. Id. Should the poor be Battered ? No ; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Id. Hamlet. Out of the present sparing and untimely thrift,...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...thee, That no revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed, and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattered ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant ' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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The Analyst: A Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, Natural History ...

Science - 1836
...revenue hast, but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flattcr'd ? ' No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,...
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Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1836
...revenue hast, but thy good spirits, [flatter'd ? To feed, and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp ; And crook the pregnant' hinges of the knee, Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear ? Since my dear soul2 was mistress of her choice,...
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