Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's, Even in these honest mean habiliments ; Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor : For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 121
by William Shakespeare - 1805
Full view - About this book

A Short History of English Literature

Harry Blamires - English literature - 1984 - 484 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Shakespearean Criticism

Michael Magoulias - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 410 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

The Chambers Book of Business Quotations

Martin H. Manser - Business & Economics - 1987 - 236 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

The Taming of the Shrew

William Shakespeare - 1987 - 25 pages
...accompanies the amazed tailor off Left. PETRUCHIO pauses for a moment, taking pity on his bedeviled bride] Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's even...poor, for 'tis the mind that makes the body rich. O, no, good Kate, neither art thou the worse for this poor furniture and mean array. [Crossing almost...
Limited preview - About this book

Ball State University Forum

Ball State University - American literature - 1988
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

The Quotable Shakespeare: A Topical Dictionary

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1988 - 544 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Privileging Gender in Early Modern England

J. R. Brink - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 264 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

Shakespeare's Comic Commonwealths

Camille Wells Slights - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 290 pages
...and then capriciously denying her the proposed finery, he expounds the moral even more explicitly: For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers...
Limited preview - About this book

Four Comedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1994 - 678 pages
...Take no unkindness of his hasty •words. Away, I say, commend me to thy master. Exit Tailor PETRUCHIO Well, come my Kate, we will unto your father's Even...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, 170 So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark Because his...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 865 pages
...amenities that preserve the social order, but also the value of judging by quality and not appearance: Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor. For...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. (IV, iii, 171-174) The man who utters these lines is a fellow of...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF