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" Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's, Even in these honest mean habiliments ; Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor : For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 121
by William Shakespeare - 1805
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The Taming of the Shrew

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 113 pages
...PETRUCHIO Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's, Even in these honest mean habiliments. 167 Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor, For...rich; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds 170 So honor peereth in the meanest habit. 171 What, is the jay more precious than the lark Because...
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Bloody Constraint: War and Chivalry in Shakespeare

Theodor Meron - Law - 1998 - 256 pages
...nobility of merit was more important than nobility of birth. Petruccio underlines the importance of merit: For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich, And as...darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. (The Taming of the Shrew, IV.iii.170-72) King Simonides makes the same point: "Opinion's but a fool,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...learn, is to teach Katherine to refrain from judging people by clothing or other superficial evidence: Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor, For...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. (IV, iii, 171-174) Later, after Kate has undergone Petruchio's...
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Shakespeare Studies, Volume 29

Leeds Barroll - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 280 pages
...labors. Finally, Petruchio decides that they will proceed to her father's house in their old clothes: For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich, And as...darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. (166-68) In the light of his previous manipulations, Petruchio's proselytizing seems a yet another...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 236 pages
...draws a moral in terms which bring the ideas that I have been tracing explicitly to the play's surface: Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's Even...darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. (1v, iii, 165-70) The tone is different from Sonnet 146, but the idea is the same: 'Within be fed,...
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Taming of the Shrew

Lindsay Price - Shakespeare, William - 2002 - 38 pages
...for thy gown tomorrow: Take no unkindness of his hasty words: The TAILOR exits in a huff. PETRUCHIO: Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's Even...habiliments: Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor; Let's see; I think 'tis now some seven o'clock, And well we may come there by dinner-time. HABERDASHER:...
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The Taming of the Shrew

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2002 - 258 pages
...Take no unkindness of his hasty words. Away I say, commend me to thy master. Exit Tailor PETRL'CH1o Well, come, my Kate, we will unto your father's Even...in these honest mean habiliments. Our purses shall he proud, our garments poor, 165 For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich, And as the sun breaks...
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Renaissance Papers 2003

Christopher Cobb, M. Thomas Hester - Literary Collections - 2004 - 192 pages
...settings-forth occur in the play. In the first Petruchio states their humble attire means no shame: "For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich; / And...as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, / So honor peereth in the meanest habit" (4.33.172-174). Doing so recalls the theme Both contain significant...
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Studying Shakespeare: A Guide to the Plays

Laurie Maguire - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 260 pages
...motif restated in the next act when he insists that they travel to her father's house in old clothes: For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers...
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The Taming of the Shrew

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 174 pages
...will90 unto your father's 165 Even in these honest mean habiliments.91 Our purses shall be proud,92 our garments poor. For 'tis the mind that makes the...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth93 in the meanest habit. 1 70 What, is the jay more precious than the lark Because his...
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