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" Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's, Even in these honest mean habiliments ; Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor : For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 121
by William Shakespeare - 1805
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 1130 pages
...[EritTai. Pet. Weil, come, my Kate ; we will unto your Even in these honest mean habiliments ; [father's, And damn'd be him that first cries, Hold, enough....Flourish. Re-enter with drum and colours, MALCOLM, old cloud, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because...
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The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 484 pages
...worst is not, So long as we can say, This is the worst. 34 — iv. 1 . 113 . Mind the test of man. "Pis the mind that makes the body rich; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peerethd in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers are...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Midsummer-night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare - 1839 - 552 pages
...round cape. a A quibble is intended between the written bUl and the bUl or weapon of a foot-soldier. Even in these honest, mean habiliments. Our purses...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers...
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All's well that ends well. Taming of the shrew. Winter's tale

William Shakespeare - 1841 - 394 pages
...Tailor. Pet. Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's, Even in these honest mean hahiliments : Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor ; For...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers...
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Synonymisches Handwörterbuch der englischen Sprache für die Deutschen: Nach ...

H. M. Melford - English language - 1841 - 466 pages
...courtier to his monarch, when you bow thus slavishly before the meanest of your mob? (H. Bulwer's Franee.) For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as...the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour 'peareth in the meanest habit. (Shakspeare.) Such is the world Lorenzo sets above That glorious promise,...
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The Complete Works of William Shakspeare: With Dr. Johnson's ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1845 - 632 pages
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843 - 376 pages
...to-morrow. Take no unkindness of his hasty words : Away, I say ; commend me to thy master. [£M*Tailor. Pet. Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's,...Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor : For 't is the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...father's, Even in these honest mean hahiliments. Our purses shall be proud , our garments poor: For 't is the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun...darkest clouds , So honour peereth in the meanest hahit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, t Because bis feathers are more beautiful? Or...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Text Formed from an Entirely ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1842 - 586 pages
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Midsummer-night's dream. Love's labor's lost. Merchant of Venice. As y@u ...

William Shakespeare - 1844 - 554 pages
...to thy master. [Exit Tailor. Pet. Well, come, my Kate ; we will unto your father's, 1 A round cape. Even in these honest, mean habiliments. Our purses...And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honor peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers...
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