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" Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant,... "
Maxims and opinions, moral, political and economical, with characters, from ... - Page 186
by Edmund Burke - 1804
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A Short History of Rudeness: Manners, Morals, and Misbehavior in Modern America

Mark Caldwell - History - 2000 - 274 pages
...Advocates of manners often repeat this idea forcefully — none more so than Edmund Burke (1729-1797): Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them,...and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform,...
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Social Science Quotations: Who Said What, When, and Where

David L. Sills, Robert King Merton - Social Science - 2000 - 437 pages
...future prognostication: they -. about us, they are upon us. Letter to a Noble Lord (1796) 1904:187. 14 Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them,...and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform,...
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On Empire, Liberty, and Reform: Speeches and Letters

Edmund Burke - History - 2000 - 525 pages
...non-negotiable trust. "Manners," he remarks in the Regicide Peace, "are of more importance than the laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend....and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform...
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International Relations in Political Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks ...

Chris Brown, Terry Nardin, Nicholas Rengger - History - 2002 - 617 pages
...can be left on the mind of a thinking man concerning their determined hostility to the human race. Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them,...and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform,...
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The Soul of Civil Society: Voluntary Associations and the Public Value of ...

Don E. Eberly, Ryan Streeter - Political Science - 2002 - 146 pages
...Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend." Burke continued, manners are "what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, sensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in." This being the case, Wilberforce concluded...
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Edmund Burke and the Natural Law

Peter James Stanlis - 2015 - 311 pages
...manners inculcated by the Church should take precedence and give the spirit to the laws of the State: Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them,...and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform,...
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Pushing to the Front, Volume 1

Orison Swett Marden - Self-Help - 2005 - 460 pages
...of a refined nature, and are the open sesame to the best of society. Manners are what vex or soothe, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us by a constant, steady, uniform, invincible operation like that of the air we breathe. Even power itself has not half the might of gentleness,...
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Family Feuds: Wollstonecraft, Burke, and Rousseau on the Transformation of ...

Eileen Hunt Botting - Social Science - 2012 - 266 pages
...relationship between manners, law, and morality: "Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us...and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform,...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Jane Austen

Janet Todd - Literary Criticism - 2006
...Domestic virtues, even of the clergy, will primarily be their own reward. Edmund Burke had written, 'Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend . . . According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.'13...
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Creating the Better Hour: Lessons from William Wilberforce

Chuck Stetson - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 349 pages
...extent, a reflection of the culture. Perhaps Edmund Burke offered the most famous encapsulation of this: "Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. "Burke continued, manners are "what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or...
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