Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 91 - 100 of 109 on far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws; but....
" far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws; but I have set an acorn, which when it becomes an oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof. "
The General Biographical Dictionary - Page 154
edited by - 1815
Full view - About this book

John Harvard and his times

Henry Charles Shelley - 1907 - 331 pages
...Mildmay, and hence the fence of his ready reply: "No, Madam, far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws; but I have set an acorn which, when it becomes an oak fj0<^ ^'one knows what will be the fruit thereof." Puritan foundation, however, Emmanuel was, and that,...
Full view - About this book

English Influence on the United States

William Cunningham - England - 1916 - 168 pages
...might have used the words of Sir Walter Mildmay, the founder of Emmanuel, who claimed that "he had set an acorn which, when it becomes an oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof 1 ." John Harvard was anxious that the young men of the Bay State should have the opportunity of coming...
Full view - About this book

Towns of New England and Old England, Ireland and Scotland ..., Part 1

State Street Trust Company (Boston, Mass.) - Cities and towns - 1920
...accused him of having erected a Puritan foundation, "No, Madam, far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws, but I have set...oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof." Although " In vain the delving antiquary tries To find the tomb where generous Harvard lies," nevertheless...
Full view - About this book

The Records of St. Bartholomew's Priory and of the Church and ..., Volume 2

Edward Alfred Webb - 1921
...Puritan foundation.' To which Mildmay replied : ' No ! Madam ; far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws ; but I have set...oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof.' In 1569 he had written to Sir William Cecil (Lord Burleigh), ' The Queen's safety and the preservation...
Full view - About this book

A Cyclopedia of Education, Volume 2

Paul Monroe - Education - 1911
..." Far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws, but (aside he added) I have set an acorn which, when it becomes an oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof." From the acorn thus planted sprang the first college of America, and so, in a degree, many other colleges...
Full view - About this book

The Cornhill Magazine

England - 1896
...one of the colleges at Cambridge, who when challenged about the object of his foundation answered, ' I have set an acorn which, when it becomes an oak, God only knows what may be the fruit thereof.' Perhaps in an ordinary way we do not sufficiently recognise...
Full view - About this book

The Confidence of British Philosophers: An Essay in Historical Narrative

Arthur Quinn - Philosophy - 1977 - 289 pages
...erected a Puritan foundation." "No, madam," Mildmay replied, "far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws; but I have set...oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof." 1629, and in 1633 he became a fellow. In 1644 the Puritan parliament presented him with the office...
Limited preview - About this book

The Statutes of Sir Walter Mildmay

Frank Stubbings, Walter Mildmay - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 176 pages
...Queen told him, Sir Walter, 1 hear you have erected a Puritan Foundation. No, Madam, saith he, farre be it from me to countenance any thing contrary to your established Lawes, but I have set an Atorn, which when it becomes an Oake, God alone knows what will be the fruit...
Limited preview - About this book

Oxford and Cambridge

Christopher Nugent Lawrence Brooke - Education - 1988 - 367 pages
...have erected a Puritan foundation' - 'No, Madam, saith he, far be it from me to countenance anything contrary to your established laws, but I have set...becomes an oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof.'10 S Brooke 1985. pp. 55-60: V. Nutton 1979. and his John Caius and the Manuscripts of Galen...
Limited preview - About this book

Judgment and Sensibility: Religion and Stratification

E. Digby (Edward Digby) Baltzell - Social Science - 1994 - 313 pages
...said Sir Walter "to countenance anything contrary to your established laws, but I have set an acom, which when it becomes an oak, God alone knows what will be the fruit thereof."20 The Church was, on the whole, understaffed with poorly trained ministers when Elizabeth...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF