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" With the unwearied application of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness, he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never, I believe, were such talents and such drudgery united. "
The Literary Magazine, and American Register - Page 358
edited by - 1805
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The Correspondence of William Cowper: Arranged in Chronological Order, Volume 1

William Cowper - 1904
...unwearied application of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness, he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never,...almost peculiar to himself. His faults are numberless, but so are his beauties. His faults are those of a great man, and his beauties are such (at least sometimes),...
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Among my books

James Russell Lowell - 1904
...that indefinable something we call Genius. " But I admire Dryden most [he had been speaking of Pope] , who has succeeded by mere dint of genius, and in spite of a laziness and a carelessness almost peculiar to himself. His faults are numberless, and so are his beauties. His...
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1730-1784

Charles Wells Moulton - American literature - 1910
...unwearied application of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness, he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never,...almost peculiar to himself. His faults are numberless, but so are his beauties. His faults are those of a great man, and his beauties are such (at least sometimes),...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...unwearied application of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness, he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never,...almost peculiar to himself. His faults are numberless, but so are his beauties. His faults are those of a great man, and his beauties are such (at least sometimes)...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...unwearied application of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness, he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never,...almost peculiar to himself. His faults are numberless, but so are his beauties. His faults are those of a great man, and his beauties are such (at least sometimes)...
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Wordsworth's Theory of Poetic Diction: A Study of the Historical and ...

Marjorie Latta Barstow Greenbie - 1917 - 191 pages
...of a plodding Flemish painter, who draws a shrimp with the most minute exactness,' says Cowper,2 'he had all the genius of one of the first masters. Never,...believe, were such talents and such drudgery united.' He found as much pleasure in correcting as in writmore like Wordsworth: 'I have often found by experience...
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The Anxieties of Idleness: Idleness in Eighteenth-century British Literature ...

Sarah Jordan - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 298 pages
...too hard. For instance, in a letter to William Unwin he ranks Dryden's poetry above Pope's, saying, "I admire Dryden most, who has succeeded by mere dint of Genius, and in spite of a laziness and a carelessness almost peculiar to himself," while Pope "was certainly a mechanical maker of verses,...
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