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" Which, as I think, you know not: Here is a letter, Found in the pocket of the slain... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 414
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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Othello, Or, Tracking the Green-eyed Monster

Nancy Linehan Charles - 2000 - 45 pages
...bad. OTHELLO. Will you, I pray, demand that devil Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body? IAGO. Demand me nothing. What you know, you know. From this time forth I never will speak word. STORYTELLER 1. And he doesn't. I wonder...did Shakespeare just get tired of writing for the rat? OTHELLO....
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Shakespeare's Noise

Kenneth Gross - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 282 pages
...demand that demi-devil / Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body?" (5 . 2 . 298 -99). lago responds, "Demand me nothing. What you know, you know. / From this time forth I never will speak word" (300— 301). This is lago mystifying motives even at the end of things, at once provoking and thwarting...
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Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay

Mary Midgley - Philosophy - 2001 - 232 pages
...Othello: Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body? logo: Demand me nothing; what you know, you know From this time forth I never will speak word. 13 It has dawned on him that he has nothing to say. Exposed, he suddenly sees with a fearful clarity...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...294-295) No one, however, speaks on Othello's behalf. Instead, lago responds from his own perspective: Demand me nothing; what you know, you know: From this time forth I never will speak word. (V, ii, 303-304) To this insolence, the Venetian nobleman Lodovico answers: "What? not to pray?" (V,...
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Absent in the Spring and Other Novels: Absent in the Spring -- Giant's Bread ...

Mary Westmacott, Agatha Christie - Fiction - 2001 - 644 pages
...understand lago," he said. "I understand even why the poor devil never says anything in the end except "Demand me nothing, what you know, you know. From this time forth, I never will speak word." He turned on me. "Fellows like you, Norreys, fellows who've lived on good terms with yourself all your...
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Symplectic Geometry and Mirror Symmetry: Proceedings of the 4th KIAS Annual ...

Kodŭng Kwahagwŏn (Korea). International Conference, Kenji Fukaya - Mirror symmetry - 2001 - 498 pages
...that he "demand that demi-devil / Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body," lago remains defiant: "Demand me nothing, what you know, you know, / From this time forth I never will speak word" (5.2.302-5). 'Why hath he?' we too want to ask. Shakespeare, as silent here as his lago, leaves it...
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Stranger Gods: Salman Rushdie's Other Worlds

Roger Y. Clark - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 226 pages
...discover the real identity of Oopervala until ninety pages later: echoing the devilish lago, who says, "Demand me nothing, what you know, you know, / From this time forth I never will speak word,"8 the satanic narrator says, "I'm saying nothing," yet then tells readers that it was he rather...
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Bringing the Devil to His Knees: The Craft of Fiction and the Writing Life

Charles Baxter, Peter Turchi - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 258 pages
...as the result of lago's conscious lies, "Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body?" And lago says, "Demand me nothing. What you know, you know. / From this time forth I never will speak a word." The stone has broken in two, the illusion is exposed, and silence takes over. To live in the...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 38

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 272 pages
...sometimes been regarded as a weakness in the play. Certainly his final speech, answering Othello's 'Why?', Demand me nothing: what you know, you know: From this time forth I never will speak word. (5.2.301-3) is no explanation, but lago has opened the play with what, for an Elizabethan audience,...
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The Reel Shakespeare: Alternative Cinema and Theory

Lisa S. Starks, Courtney Lehmann - Drama - 2002 - 298 pages
...the terror—of tragedy are finally his; the effect virtually undoes the obduracy of his final lines: "Demand me nothing; what you know, you know: / From this time forth I never will speak word" (5.2.303-4). Here is a double bind if there ever was one: in what perhaps innumerable ways does such...
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