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" Which, as I think, you know not: Here is a letter, Found in the pocket of the slain... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 414
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body ? logo. Demand me nothing. What you know, you know; From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What ? not to pray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body? logo. Demand me nothing. What you know, you know ; From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What? not to pray? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...do believe it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil. Why he li. ч h of the distracted multitude, Who like not in their...their pyns: • And, where 'tis so, the offender's »peak word. Lod. What? not topray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. О/А. Well, thou dost best....
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...hath thus ensnared my soul and body ? * Account. t To see if his feet be cloven. J By the stratagem. lago. Demand me nothing : What you know, you know : From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What? not to pray? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1853
...believe it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil Why he hath thus ensnared / Lod. What, not to pray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1854
...cause. Oth. I do believe it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body ? lago. Demand...time forth I never will speak word. Lad. What? not ton ray ? Gra. Torments will one your liiis Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lad. Sir, you shall understand...
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Emmanuel Appadocca; or, Blighted life, Volume 2

Michel Maxwell Philip - 1854
...boat, with its angry crew, was left floating far behind in the wake of the flying schooner. CHAPTER " Demand me nothing ; what you know you know ; From this time forth I never will speak word." OTHELLO. "Torments will ope your lips," IBID. AFTER he had been defeated by the untoward accident of...
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The Shakespeare Papers of the Late William Maginn

William Maginn - 1856 - 353 pages
...murdered Roderigo. His determination to keep silence when questioned was at least judicious : — " Demand me nothing : what you know, you know ; From this time forth I never will speak word" — for, with his utmost ingenuity, he could hardly find any thing to say for himself. Is there nothing,...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...much a devil without it. H. *• Thus both quartos : the folio has cursed instead of damned. H. logo. Demand me nothing : what you know, you know. From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What ! not to pray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. OtJi. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you...
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The Stratford Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight, Volumes 17-22

William Shakespeare - 1856
...pardon. Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body ? IAGO. Demand me nothing : What you know, you know : From this time forth I never will speak word. LOD. What ? not to pray ? GRA. Torments will ope your lips. OTH. Well, thou dost best. LOD. Sir, you...
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