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" Which, as I think, you know not: Here is a letter, Found in the pocket of the slain... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 414
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1818
...cause. Oth. I do believe it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body ? lago. Demand me nothing: What you know, you know : x From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What ? not to pray ? Gra. Torments will ope...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - 1821
...it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body ? lago. Demand me nothing: what you...know : From this time forth I never will speak word. * Account. t To see if his feet be clovetu J By the stvaVagem. VOL. vt C ccc Lod. What? not to pray...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 13

William Shakespeare - 1821
...you were best ; " What I have done, I have done ; I'll confess nothing." Apparently from Othello : " Demand me nothing ; what you know, you know ; " From this time forth I never will speak word." Again, the Cardinal, speaking to his mistress Julia, who had imoortuned him to disclose the cause of...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1823
...pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body r lago. Demand me nothing: What you know, you know : From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What? nottopray? Ora. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you shall...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1823
...Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body ? \f logo. Demand me nothing: What you know, you know: From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What ? not to pray ? 5 towards his feet ;] To see if, according to the common opinion, his feet...
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The Plays, Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1824
...cause. Oth. I do believe it, and I ask your pardon. Will you, I pray you, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body ? lago. Demand...know : From this time forth I never will speak word. Lod. What ? not to pray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thou dost best. . Lod. Sir,...
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The British Theatre: Or, A Collection of Plays, which are Acted at ..., Volume 5

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1824
...it, and 1 ask your pardon. — Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil, Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body ? lago. Demand me nothing : What...know: From this time forth I never will speak word. Oth. Weil, thou dost best. Lod. Sir, you shall understand what hath befall'n, Which, as I think, you...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1824
...Will you, I pray you, demand that derni-devR, Wliy be hath thus ensnar'd ray soul and body ? logo. Demand me nothing: What you know, you know : From...time forth I never will speak word. Lad. What ? not topray ? Gra. Torments will ope your lips. Oth. Well, tlii.ii dost best. Lod. Sir, you thall understand...
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The dramatic works of Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson and Stevens [sic ...

William Shakespeare - 1824
...your pardon. Will yon, I pray you, demand thatdemi-devi), Why he hath thus insnared my soul and body 1 lago. Demand me nothing : What you know, you know : From this time forth I never will speak word bod. What? not to pray? Gra. Tormenta will ope your lips. Oth. Well, thon dost beet. Ltod. Sir, you...
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The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 1

Phrenology - 1824
...nature, in representing lago as henceforth doggedly silent. To a question from Othello, he replies :— Demand me nothing : What you know, you know ; From this time forth, I never will speak a word. This is just the conduct which we should expect from one in whom, with deficient moral sentiments,...
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