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" The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right... "
Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books ; with an Analysis of the ... - Page 151
by William Blackstone - 1836
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Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States: With a ..., Volume 3

Joseph Story - Constitutional history - 1833 - 776 pages
...restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was...
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Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States: With a ..., Volume 2

Joseph Story - Constitutional history - 1833 - 736 pages
...restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...the press. But, if he publishes what is improper, Abr. 89 mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the...
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The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British and Foreign India ...

Asia - 1836
...free man is considered to have an undoubted right to lay what sentiments be pleases before the public, but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous,...he must take the consequence of his own temerity.* In states where the government is despotic, that is, where no representative system exists, and where...
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Commentaries on the Constitution and Laws of England: Incorporated with the ...

Thomas George Western, Jean Louis de Lolme - Constitutional law - 1838 - 476 pages
...fact, be very fitly considered as a part of the common law of the land. Blackstone (1) observes that every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid that, is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or...
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The Dublin Review, Volume 7

Nicholas Patrick Wiseman - 1839
...him in the esteem of the public, or exposed him to ridicule. Blackstone tells us that " every person has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases...before the public : to forbid this is to destroy the liberty of the press. But if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the...
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A Familiar Exposition of the Constitution of the United States: Containing a ...

Joseph Story - Constitutional law - 1840 - 372 pages
...restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity. To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was...
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The English Constitution: A Popular Commentary on the Constitutional Law of ...

George Bowyer - Constitutional law - 1841 - 712 pages
...publication of men's opinions, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter spoken or published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; but if he publishes, orally or otherwise, what is illegal, he must take the consequences of his own...
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The safety of Jersey; being a familiar illustration of the forms, practice ...

Yonge - 1841
...afforded very striking illustrations of the title of his pamphlet. " Every freeman," says Blackstone, " has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public—to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the Press." The writer here, lays no sentiments...
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The oriental rambler, or, The papers of Polyphilus

Polyphilus (pseud.) - 1844
...of which too many are apt to take advantage. Judge Blackstone remarks on the Freedom of the Press, " Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...he must take the consequence of his own temerity." In foreign lands especially those which are subject to British power, printing is a thriving trade....
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State Trials of the United States During the Administrations of Washington ...

Francis Wharton - Trials - 1849 - 727 pages
...restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for* criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments...improper, mischievous or illegal, he must take the consequences of his temerity. To punish dangerous or offensive writings, which, when published, shall,...
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