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" He's here in double trust ; First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed ; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek,... "
The Plays of William Shakspeare: Comedy of errors ; Macbeth ; King John ... - Page 98
by William Shakespeare, Alexander Chalmers - 1847
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The Life of Edmund Kean, Volume 2

Barry Cornwall - Actors - 1835 - 496 pages
...Macbeth slays Duncan, " the gracious Duncan ; " but he is sensible of his virtues : he admits that he " Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off;" and he is agitated by a crowd of fancies, and bears with him all the pains of an unceasing...
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Winter's tale. Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John. Richard II. Henry IV, pt. 1

William Shakespeare - 1836
...anciently used in the sense of the Latin commendo, to commit, to address, to direct, to recommend. To our own lips. He's here in double trust : First,...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off; And pity, like a naked, new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed...
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Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1836 - 402 pages
...inventor. This even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice To our own lips. He 's here in double trust: First, as I am his kinsman and...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps...
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Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - 1836
...his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties4 so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that...naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air,5 Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,...
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The Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1837 - 398 pages
...taught, return To plague the inventor. This even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice To our own lips. He's here in double trust:...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off. * * * * * • I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition,...
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The Harmony of Phrenology with Scripture: Shewn in a Refutation of the ...

William Scott - Phrenology - 1837 - 354 pages
...but the universal condemnation of the world which will pursue the perpetrator of so great a crime, Besides this, Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek,...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off. And pity, like a naked new born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed...
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The Elements of Moral Science

Francis Wayland - Christian ethics - 1838 - 398 pages
...first, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Vf ho should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off. * ***** I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1839
...ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips. He's here in double trust: First, as I am bis kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed...babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubin, hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air,9 Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Winter's tale. Comedy of errors ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...used in the sense Of the Latin commendo, to commit, to address, to direct, to recommend. VOL. in. 25 To our own lips. He's here in double trust : First,...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off; And pity, like a naked, new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Winter's tale. Comedy of errors ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...is (motion. "To surcease or to cease from doing something; supersedeo (Lath cesser (Fr.)"—Baret. To our own lips. He's here in double trust: First,...trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off; And pity, like a naked, new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed...
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