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" ... description whatever, has come up, in the one instance, to the pure sentiments of morality, or, in the other, to that variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness... "
Memoirs of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales - Page 111
1808
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Memoirs of the Life of the Rt. Hon. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Volume 2

Thomas Moore - 1853
...strength of expression, to which they had that day listened. From poetry up to eloquence there was not a species of composition of which a complete and perfect specimen might not have been culled, from one part or the other of the speech to which he alluded, and which, he was persuaded,...
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The Dublin university magazine

University magazine - 1855
...variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness of style, pathos...from that single speech, be culled and collected. " Fox said, " that all he hud ever heard or read, when compared with it, dwindled into nothing, and...
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The Fifth, Or, Elocutionary Reader, in which the Principles of Elocution are ...

Salem Town - Readers - 1855 - 480 pages
...copiousness of style, pathos and sublimity of con- ; ception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there...from that single speech, be culled and collected. SECTION IV. ETJLE 3. The repetition of any word, rendered important by its connection in a sentence,...
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The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 36

1855
...variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness of style, pathos...conception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there is not a species of composition of which a...
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The Rhetorical Reader

Ebenezer Porter - Elocution - 1856 - 504 pages
...copiousness of style, pathos and sublimity of conception, to which we have this day listened with 110 ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there...from that single speech be culled and collected." EXERCISE 118. Spirit of the American Revolution.—JOSIAH QUINCY, JK. 5 by the terms " moderation and...
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Self-culture in Reading, Speaking, and Conversation: Designed for the Use of ...

William Sherwood - Conversation - 1856 - 383 pages
...force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength aud copiousness of style, pathos and sublimity of conception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there is not a species of composition of which a...
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The Most Eminent Orators and Statesmen of Ancient and Modern Times ...

David Addison Harsha - Orators - 1857 - 520 pages
...variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness of style, pathos...conception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there is not a species of composition of which a...
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Progressive Fifth Elocutionary Reader

Salem Town - 1857
...variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness of style, pathos...conception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there is not a species of composition of which a...
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The Dramatic Works of the Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan

Richard Brinsley Sheridan, George Gabriel Sigmond - 1857 - 563 pages
...strength of expression to which they had this day listened. From poetry up to eloquence, there was not a species of composition of which a complete and perfect specimen might not have been culled from one part or other of the speech to which he alluded, and which he was persuaded...
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The Fifth Or Elocutionary Reader: In which the Principles of Elocution are ...

Salem Town - Readers - 1859 - 480 pages
...variety of knowledge, force of imagination, propriety and vivacity of allusion, beauty and elegance of diction, strength and copiousness of style, pathos...conception, to which we have this day listened with ardor and admiration. From poetry up to eloquence, there is not a species of composition of which a...
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