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" My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was dry with rage, and extreme toil, Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat... "
The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare - Page 336
by William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1858
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son.* HOT. nd beatc me to death, With and trimly dress'd, (") First folio omits, nai,ie. It) First f"Uu, Ğuğ. • Kither en\y, therefore,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1858 - 40 pages
...your majesty : Ether envy, therefore, or misprision Ь guilty of this fault, and not my son.* Нот. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly drees'd, (*) First folio omite, name. (t) First fulio, irai. • Either envy, therefore,...
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Works, Volume 2

Leigh Hunt - English literature - 1859
...COXCOMB.1 Ufttpur ginet an account of a noble coxcomb, who peitertd him at an unteatonable moment. Hotspur. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest home;...
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The elements of elocution and correct reading

Charles Richson - 1860
...grace's secretary. Pope. 4. Hotspur's Sarcastic description of a Foppish Nobleman oi the Field of Battle. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress 'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest home...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, from the Text of Johnson ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1862
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision, Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Sot. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd. Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home...
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The Works of Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1862
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son.* HOT. . — {Exit WEST. Now, Falstaff, where have you been...will, on my life, One time or other break some gallow and trimly dresa'd, ( • I First folio omitl, name. (t) First folio, teat. * Either envy, therefore,...
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The Historical Shakespearian Reader: Comprising the "Histories," Or ...

William Shakespeare - 1863 - 503 pages
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Hot. My liege, I did deny no prisoners: But I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home...
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Scraps. [An anthology, ed.] by H. Jenkins

esq Henry Jenkins - 1864
...would thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought.— Act 1. Sc. 2. Hotspur. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But I remember...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble- land at harvest-home...
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The Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of ...

William Shakespeare, John William Stanhope Hows - Readers - 1864 - 447 pages
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Hot. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home...
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The dramatic works of William Shakespeare, with copious glossarial notes and ...

William Shakespeare - 1864
...your majesty : Either envy, therefore, or misprision, Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Hot. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress VI, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new-reap'd, Sliow'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home...
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