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" ... [He might have said the same of writers too, if he had pleased.] In the lowest form he places those whom he calls les petits esprits, such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a playhouse ; who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit, prefer... "
The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes - Page 201
by John Dryden, Walter Scott - 1821
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - English literature - 1836
...calls ISM petite esprit* — such things as are our upper gallery audience in a playhouse, who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit ; prefer a quibble,...these are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it. But, though they make the greatest appearance in...
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Spectator (The)

English essays - 1836 - 714 pages
...аз are our upper-gallery audience in a playhouse ; who like nothing but the husk ud rind of wit, and prefer a quibble, a conceit, an epigram, before solid sense and elegant expression. Tsese are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood far parliament-men, we know already who would firry...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 1

1838
...calls les petiti esprits ; such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a play-house, who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit; prefer a quibble,...sense and elegant expression. These are mob readers, and through their ignorant criticisms create a shoal of authors of the same level. There is a middle...
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The Spectator: With a Biographical and Critical Preface, and Explanatory ...

1853
...are our upper-gallery audience in a playhouse ; who like nothing but the husk an'3 rind of wit, and prefer a quibble, a conceit, an epigram, before solid...we know already who would carry it. But though they made the greatest appearance in the field, and cried the loudest, the best on it is, they are but a...
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The Spectator, Volume 1

Alexander Chalmers - Spectator (London, England : 1711) - 1853
...calls Les Petits Esprits, such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a play-house ; who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit, prefer a quibble,...These are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it. But though they made the greatest appearance in...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others] with sketches of the lives of the ...

Spectator The - 1853
...are our upper gallery audience in a playhouse; who like nothing but the 'husk and rind of wit, and prefer a quibble, a conceit, an epigram, before solid...these are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it. But though they made the greatest appearance in...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 2

Joseph Addison - 1854 - 8 pages
...calls Les Petiis Esprits ; such things as are our upjfer-gallery audience in & play-house ; who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit ; prefer a quibble,...stood for parliament-men, we know already who would cany it. But though they make the greatest appearance in the field, and cry the loudest, the best on't...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: Including the Whole Contents of Bp ..., Volume 4

Joseph Addison - English literature - 1854
...he calls Les Petits Esprits; such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a play-house, who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit, prefer a quibble,...these are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it. But though they make the greatest appearance in...
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The Works Of... Joseph Addison

Joseph Addison - 1854
...Esprits; such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a play-house, who like nothing but the^husk and rind of wit, prefer a quibble, a conceit, an epigram,...these are mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it. But though they make the greatest appearance in...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1854
...he calls Les Petits Esprits; such things as are our upper-gallery audience in a play-house, who like nothing but the husk and rind of wit, prefer a quibble,...before solid sense, and elegant expression : these arc mob readers. If Virgil and Martial stood for parliament men, we know already who would carry it....
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