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Books Books 81 - 90 of 164 on Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe....
" Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe alone, thus tradition has told us, repeated in a low voice to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country churchyard inspired the muse... "
History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles ... - Page 244
1844
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New National Third Reader

Charles Joseph Barnes - Readers - 1884 - 240 pages
...hour:— The paths of glory lead but to the grave." As he concluded the beautiful verses, he said, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Q,\ cebec!" heights under which he was hurrying. At length he recognized the appointed spot and leaped...
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A simple sketch of the history of England, from the time of the Britons to ...

England - 1884
...great stress on one line : — "The path of glory leads but to the grave." " Now, gentlemen," he cried, "I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." When tho boats reached that point at the foot of the cliffs for which they had been steering, tho men...
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Chambers's graduated readers, Book 6

Chambers W. and R., ltd - 1885
...his side, Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard; and as he concluded the beautiful verses, he said : ' Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.' But while Wolfe thus, in the poet's words, gave vent to the intensity of his feelings, his eye was...
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Parry's Monthly Magazine, Volume 3

1887
...boat, in a low voice, Gray's "Elegy written in a Country Churchyard;" and, when he finished, said, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." Wolfe was among the first to leap on shore. There was but one path leading upwards to the brow of the...
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Studies in English Literature: Being Typical Selections of British and ...

William Swinton - American literature - 1886 - 638 pages
...stanzas with which a country church-yard inspired the muse of Gray, and at the close of the recitation, 'Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.'"' For himself, he was within a few hours to find fulfilment of that noble line — " The paths of glory...
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The English Language: Its Grammar, History, and Literature: With Chapters on ...

John Miller Dow Meiklejohn - English language - 1886 - 388 pages
...General Wolfe, when sailing clown to attack Quebec, recited the Elegy to his officers, and declared, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." Lord Byron called the Elegy " the corner-stone of Gray's poetry." Gray ranks with Milton as the most...
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Palace and the Hospital: Or, Chronicles of Greenwich, Volume 2

Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange - Great Britain - 1886
...repeated in whispers, ' Grey's Elegy,' then not long published, to some of the officers, observing, ' I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.' As they landed, they were challenged by a sentry, but one of the captains replied, ' La France,' and...
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Palace and the Hospital: Or, Chronicles of Greenwich, Volume 2

Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange - Great Britain - 1886
...repeated in whispers, ' Grey's Elegy,' then not long published, to some of the officers, observing, ' I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.' As they landed, they were challenged by a sentry, but one of the captains replied, ' La France,' and...
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The English Language: Its Grammar, History, and Literature, with Chapters on ...

John Miller Dow Meiklejohn - English language - 1887 - 466 pages
...General Wolfe, when sailing down to attack Quebec, recited the Elegy to his officers, and declared, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." Lord Byron called the Elegy "the corner-stone of Gray's poetry." Gray ranks with Milton as the most...
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A history of Connecticut

Elias Benjamin Sanford - Connecticut - 1887 - 371 pages
...he repeated the stanzas of Gray's "Elegy in a Country Churchyard," and as he closed, quietly said, " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." At the head of his brave soldiers he guided the way up the narrow path, where two men could not go...
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