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Books Books 61 - 70 of 163 on Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe....
" Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe alone, thus tradition has told us, repeated in a low voice to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country churchyard inspired the muse... "
History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles ... - Page 244
1844
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The Discovery and Conquests of the Northwest: Including the Early History of ...

Rufus Blanchard - Chicago - 1880 - 514 pages
...bank, he repeated to his companions one of its lines — "The path of glory leads but to the grave." "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem, than take Quebec," said he. ''Perhaps the noblest tribute ever paid by arms to letters, since that heroic era when hostile...
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Masterpieces of English Literature: Being Typical Selections of British and ...

William Swinton - American literature - 1880 - 638 pages
...stanzas with which a country church-yard inspired the muse of Gray, and at the close of the recitation, 'Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec."" For himself, he was within a few hours to find fulfilment of that noble line — " The paths of glory...
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The new national reading books, Part 7

New national reading books - 1880
...side, ' Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard ; ' and, as he concluded the beautiful verses said : ' Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ! ' 3. But while Wolfe thus, in the poet's words, gave vent to the intensity of his feelings, his eye...
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A Festival of Art, Poetry and Song: Selections from the Greatest Poets of ...

Frederick Saunders - American poetry - 1880 - 392 pages
...must have seemed at such a time fraught with mournful meaning ; and turning to his officers, said : " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec !" There are two manuscripts of the Elegy in existence ; and they were recently (in 1854) sold at auction...
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English Literature in the Eighteenth Century

Alfred Hix Welsh - English literature - 1880 - 158 pages
...tones, to the other officers in his boat: 'Now gentlemen,' said he at the close of the recitation, 'I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec !' One stanza, one noble line, must have been fraught with a mournful meaning: The boast of Heraldry,...
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The Visions of England, Part 2

Francis Turner Palgrave - Great Britain - 1881 - 353 pages
...those beauti' ful stanzas with which a Country Church Yard inspired the muse ' of Gray. At the close Wolfe added, Now, gentlemen, I would ' rather be the author of that poem, than take Quebec ' : (Mahon's Hist. ch. xxxv). Wolfe's brilliant victory is also one of the most critical in our history....
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The Granville series. Reading book. Standard 1-6

Granville series - 1881
...side, Gray's "Elegy in a Country Churchyard;" and as he concluded the beautiful verses, he said, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ! " 8. But while Wolfe thus in the poet's words gave vent to the intensity 10 of his feelings, his...
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Discovery and Conquests of the North-west, with the History of Chicago, Part 6

Rufus Blanchard - Chicago - 1881 - 768 pages
...bank, he repeated to his companions one of its lines — "The path of glory leads but to the grave." "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec," said he. "Perhaps the noblest tribute ever paid by arms to letters, since that heroic era when hostile...
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Young Folks' History of America

Hezekiah Butterworth - United States - 1881 - 543 pages
...Elegy in a Country Churchyard," then newly received from England ; and he exclaimed at its close, " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec to-morrow." He was a man of feeble bodily frame, but he wielded the power which genius in its higher...
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English History for Schools, B.C. 55-A.D. 1880

Samuel Rawson Gardiner - Great Britain - 1881 - 471 pages
...One of these lines was, ' The paths of glory lead but to the grave.' ' Now, gentlemen,1 he said, ' I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ! ' At last the boats reached the point at the foot of the cliffs for which they had been steering....
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