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Books Books 51 - 60 of 161 on Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe....
" Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe alone, thus tradition has told us, repeated in a low voice to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country churchyard inspired the muse... "
History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles ... - Page 244
1844
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Select Poems of Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray - English poetry - 1876 - 143 pages
...low tone to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country churchyard inspired the muse of Gray. One noble line, ' The paths...rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.' " Hales, in his Introduction to the poem, remarks : " The Elegy is perhaps the most widely known poem...
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The Poetical Works of Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray - English poetry - 1876 - 334 pages
...a few hours were to close over life's last utterance in the placid content of a victor's death,) he added, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec !" This pleasing and pathetic incident was preserved in the memory of the late Professor Robison of...
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A Popular History of England: From the Earliest Times to the ..., Volume 4

Guizot (M., François) - Great Britain - 1876
...Wolfe alone repeating in a low tone Gray's " Elegy in a Country Churchyard," adding as he finished, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." It was scarcely daybreak when the English army occupied the heights of Abraham. A skirmish had been...
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A History of England from the Earliest Times to the Revolution in 1688 ...

David Hume - 1876
...officers in the boat with him Gray's beautiful Elegy in a Country Church-yard, adding at the end, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." Wolfe himself was one of the first to leap ashore. The precipitous path was climbed ; an outpost of...
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England Under the Revolution and the House of Hanover 1688 to 1820

James Birchall - Great Britain - 1876
...IV. ,159-162; Wai-burton's Conquest ol Canada, chap. 26. t Masscy's George the Third, I., 37-38. 1759 "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem, than take Quebec."* But while the ardent General thus gave vent to the intensity of his feelings, his eye was constantly...
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The Royal Readers, Issue 5

Thomas Nelson Publishers - 1879
...side, Gray's " Elegy in a Country Churchyard;"6 and as he concluded the beautiful verses, he said, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ! " But while Wolfe thus in the poet's words gave vent to the intensity of his feelings, his eye was...
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The history of England ... to the accession of queen Victoria, ed ..., Volume 3

François Pierre G. Guizot - 1877
...in a Country Churchyard." As his foot touched the land, he turned round to say to his lieutenants, " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." It was scarcely day-break when the English army occupied the heights of Abraham. A skirmish had been...
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The British Parliament ... The pearls and mock pearls of history ...

Abraham Hayward - Biography - 1878
...the whole of Gray's ' Elegy ' in a low voice to the officers in his boat, and said at the close — ' Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.' The first of these anecdotes is a reminiscence of the late Right Hon. Thomas Grenville, who had it...
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Moffatt's How to teach reading

Thomas J. Livesey - 1879
...as they floated down the St. Lawrence under Abraham's Heights, and saying, when he had finished it, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ;" or of Wordsworth, meeting a little cottage girl at Conway, and holding converse with her just as...
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The Story of Liberty

Charles Carleton Coffin - History, Universal (Juvenile) - 1879 - 415 pages
...wealth, e'er gave, Await, alike, th' inevitable hour ; The paths of glory lead but to the grave." " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec to-morrow," said he. But would the poem ever have been written if the Army of God had not set up its...
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