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Books Books 31 - 40 of 159 on Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe....
" Not a word was spoken, not a sound was heard beyond the rippling of the stream. Wolfe alone, thus tradition has told us, repeated in a low voice to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country churchyard inspired the muse... "
History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles ... - Page 244
1844
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The Constable of France: And Other Military Historiettes

James Grant - Adventure and adventurers - 1866 - 366 pages
...lead but to the grave! " Wolfe repeated that beautiful line with mournful emphasis, and added i — " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem, than the captor of Quebec \" (Lord Mahon, vol. iv.) One of the most active in scaling the heights, and in...
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Lectures on English Literature: From Chaucer to Tennyson

Henry Reed - English literature - 1867 - 387 pages
...to the other officers in his boat those beautiful stanzas with which a country church-yard in spired the muse of Gray. One noble line ' The paths of glory...rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec !' "* Of Gray, and Goldsmith, and Cowper this is also to be remembered — that they have enriched...
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A household book of English poetry, selected with notes by R.C. Trench

Richard Chenevix Trench (abp. of Dublin) - 1868
...these lines in a low voice to the other officers in his boat, adding at the close of the recitation, ' Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec. ' For himself within a few hours that line was to find its fulfilment, ' The paths of glory lead but...
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Metrical epitaphs, ancient and modern, ed. by J. Booth

Metrical epitaphs - 1868
...General Wolfe, before he made his attack on Quebec, where he fell, declared to his fellow soldiers, " Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." " Had Gray ON VERTUE, THE ENGRAVER. WESTMINSTER ABBEY CLOISTERS." WITH manners gentle, and a grateful...
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A SMALLER HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE YEAR 1863

WILLIAM SMITH, LL.D. - 1868
...Gray's Elegy to his officers, and, pausing on the line, " The paths of glory lead but to the grave," he added, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author. of that poem than to take Quebec." The enterprise succeeded perfectly. Montcalm was forced to abandon his position and...
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A History of England, from the Earliest Times to the Revolution in 1688 ...

1869 - 789 pages
...the officers in the boat with him Gray's beautiful Elegy in a Country Church-yard, adding at the end, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." Wolfe himself was one of the first to leap ashore. The precipitous path was climbed ; an outpost of...
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Favourite English poems and poets

1870
...Wolfe repeated the lines to his officers in the boat with him, and at the close of the recitation, added — "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec ;" the gallant soldier and hero realising to the full, within a very few hours, that striking stanza...
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Western Skies: A Narrative of American Travel in 1868

John H. Bell - Atlantic States - 1870 - 379 pages
...oars. None spoke but Wolfe, who repeated to his officers some verses of "Gray's Elegy," observing, "Now gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." I have stood on the shingle of the cove where they landed. You would think there was no pass from below,...
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A Household Book of English Poetry

Richard Chenevix Trench - English poetry - 1870 - 438 pages
...these lines in a low voice to the other officers in his boat, adding a1 the close of the recitation, ' Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec." For himself within a few hours that line was to find its fulfilment, ' The paths of glory lead but...
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The United States of America: A History

Robert Mackenzie - United States - 1870 - 278 pages
...Elegy in a Country Churchyard," then newly received from England ; and he exclaimed at its close, " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec to-morrow." He was a man of feeble bodily frame, but he wielded the power which genius in its higher...
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