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charming. The last verse is imitated from Herbe

0, Father of eternal life, and all

Created glories under thee !
Resume thy spirit from this world of thrall

Into true liberty.
Either disperse these mists which blot and all

My perspective as they pass,
Or else remove me hence unto that Hill

Where I shall need no glass.
The image of the bird, in the 6th stanza, is

poem on Grace.

Appointed for

my second

THE RETREAT.
HAPPY those early days, when I
Shined in my angel-infancy.
Before I understood this place,

race,
Or taught my soul to fancy ought
But a white, celestial thought,-
When yet I had not walk d above
A mile or two from my first love,
And looking back (at that short space)
Could see a glimpse of his bright face.
When on some gilded cloud or flower
My gazing soul would dwell an hour;
And in those weaker glories spy
Some shadows of eternity.

Oh, how I long to travel back,
And tread again that ancient track!
That I might once more reach that plain,
Where first I left my glorious train,
From whence the enlightened spirit sees

The shady City of Palm Trees.
These lines will find an echo in many bosoms, for the

aspiration must have risen to the lips of ever! But we know that “the enlightened spirit" be

same

one.

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longs more to the maturity of age than to the inexperienced innocence of childhood; and to the eye of the Christian pilgrim, in the most desolate path of his wanderings, "the shady City of Palm Trees" is visible, and the blackness of the remote horizon often glows with the orient light of the City of Paradise.

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Resum is a fun this world of thrall
Either as these mists which blot and fil
DAN BE De hence unto that Hill

Per / shall need no glass.
Iz ingy d the bird, in the 6th stanza, is very
Before I understood this place,
Appointed for my second race,

The last verse is imitated from Herbert's

The RETREAT.
those early days, when I
Shised in my angel-infancy.
Or taught my soul to fancy ought
Bat a white, celestial thought,
When yet I had not walkd above
A mile or two from my first love,
And looking back (at that short space)
Could see a

glimpse of his bright face.
When on some gilded cloud or flower
My gazing soul would dwell an hour;
And in those weaker glories spy
Some shadows of eternity.

Oh, how I long to travel back,
And tread again that ancient track !
That I might once more reach that plain,
Where first I left my glorious train

,
From whence the enlightened spirit sees

The shady City of Palm Trees.
These lines will find an echo in many bosoms, for the

espiration must have risen to the lips of every
el

. But we know that "the enlightened spirit" be

THE WREATH.
Addressed to the Redeemer.
Since I in storms most used to be,

And seldom yielded flowers,
How shall I get a wreath for Thee

From these rude barren hours ?
The softer dressings of the spring,

Or summer's later store,
I will not for Thy temples bring,

Which thorns, not roses, wore ;
But a twined wreath of grief and praise,

Praise soild with tears, and tears again
Shining with joy, like dewy days,

This day I bring for all Thy pain,
Thy causeless pain, and as sad death,

Which sadness breathes in the most vain,
O, not in vain ! now beg Thy breath,

Thy quickening breath, which gladly bears
Through saddest clouds to that glad place

Where cloudless quires sing without tears,

Sing Thy just praise and see Thy face ! A pretty verse on the burial of an infant should not be omitted :

Blest infant bud whose blossom-life,

Did only look about and fall,
Weary'd out with harmless strife

Of milk and tears, the food of all.

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AFTER an anxious search in all the accessible of information, I am able to tell little of one every lover of poetry must desire to know = The day of his birth and of his decease are inv= eminent Divine, and Preacher at the Temple. Hhowever, brought him more fame than profit, confessed that he had spent his patrimony in books, and his time in scribbling them. Yelverton I, by whom his son Richard was pla

RICHARD CRASHAW.

1613 - 16 u Crashaw was born in London.

His father

At t of the reign of Elizabeth he had also been depri a little vicarage*." But his learning and virtues for him the esteem of many learned and excellen and particularly of Sir Randolph Crew, and Sin

Catalogue.

Discourse on Popishe Corruption Requiringe a King mation; among the Ms. Books in the Royal Library. Se

+ He was intimate with Archbishop Usher, as an extract fro Canto, in folio, which

you said you lent to Dr. Mocket, and it; yet I could never get it, and now I find my book, at Mr. his shop, in Duke Lane, and he saith he bought it with Dr. library but I cannot have it. Happily you might; by your te of it as you go that way... Thus longing to see you, and till me word what day you will be here, 1 commend us unto God,

Yours in Christ,

WILLIAM CRAS

Appendix to Parr's Life of Sir Henry Yelverton was appointed Solicitor-General so 1613, and Attorney-General in 1616. In 1625, he was one of the of the King's Bench, and subsequently of the Common Pleas. A

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AMÉs earch in all the accessible sounts

stimuria ) am able to tell little of one of whan
may have a pretty must desire to know so much
Morato Arth and of his decease are inrolmed i
Caso o bom in London. His father was a

Dizz, and Preacher at the Temple. His works
Astand that he had spent his patrimony in baying

banks and his time in scribbling them. At the close
viele Tharaget." But his learning and virtues procured
to be the esteem of many learned and excellent ment,

sed urticularly of Sir Randolph Crew, and Sir Henry
de Prelate will show :-"I lent you Josseline de Vitis Archiep.
il could never get it, and now I find my book at Mr. Edwards

1613-14 wij
of Elizabeth he had also been deprived of a

the foundation of the Charter House School, where he highly distinguished himself under Brooks, a celebrated master of that day, whom he afterwards addressed in an epigram, full of attachment and respect. I had hoped, from a reference to the Registers of the School, to have determined the period of his admission, but they contain no entry before 1680. How long he continued there is equally uncertain. He was elected a scholar of Pembroke Hall, March 26, 1632*, and yet we find him lamenting the premature death of his friend, William Herrys, a fellow of the same College, which happened in the October of 1631. Herrys had been originally entered of Christ's, and his relations were persons of property and consideration, in the county of Essex. Crashaw calls him the sweetest among men, and mourced his fate in five epitaphs, one of which was in Latin.

In 1633 he took his Bachelor's Degree, and, in 1634, published anonymously, a volume of Epigrammata Sacra, inscribed to Benjamin Laney, the Master of Pembroke Hall. In the civil war, Laney was deprived of his situation, and suffered much persecution and many hardships for his loyalty.

The guides of the poet's youthful studies were always esteemed, and their memory preserved in his heart. Of Mr. Tournay, the tutor of Pembroke, he spoke in grateful language, as of one who merited his respect f. narrative, written by himself, " of what passed on his being restored to the King's favour, in 1609," is printed in the fifteenth volume of the drchcologia, p. 27. • From the College Register, qunted in Cole's MSS.

+ Tutori Summe Observando,—"We have had some doings here of laxe about one of Pembroke Hall, who preaching in St. Mary's, about the beginning of Lent, upon that text James ü, 22, seemed to avouch' the

but I cannot have it. Happily you might, by your testimony

, to get it me, for I charged him not to sell it

. I pray think mend what day you will be here, I commend us uato God, and 20, Youns in Christ,

WILLIAN CRASKAW."

Appendis to Parr's Life of Usher. Sir Henry Yelverton was appointed Solicitor-General soon after wis, and Attorney-General in 1616. In 1625, he was one of the Judges of the King's Bench, and subsequently of the Common Pleas. A curious

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In 1635 he prefixed a copy of verses to Rob ford's Five Pious and Learned Discourses. She of Peterhouse, and Rector of Ringsfield, in

1635.

Crashaw's recommendation of this work requirfor it was considered to advocate doctrines in the established church. Archbishop Usher it with indignation, in a letter to Dr. Ward, purity of our ancient truth, how cometh it to you at Cambridge do cast such stumbling-bloc way, by publishing into the world such rotter Shelford hath vented in his Five Discourses, possis agnoscere. The Jesuits of England sent book hither to confirm our papists in their o

“ But, while we strive here to mais he hath so carried bimself ut famosi Perni ar and to assure them that we are now coming them as fast as we can. I pray God this sin deeply laid to their charge, who give an occasia blind thus to stumble *." This fact enables us the gradually growing inclination of Crashav Roman Catholic faith. His mystical and ent insufficiency of faith to justification, and to impugn the doct IIth article, of Justification by faith only; for which he was by the ViceChancellor, who was willing to accept of an eas ledgment: but the

same party preaching his Latin sermon, pro last week, upon Rom. iii, 28, he said, he came not palinodiam eandem cantilenam canere, which moved our Vice-Chancellor, to call for his sermon, which he refused to deliver. Whereu Wednesday last, being Barnaby Day, the day appointed for sion of the Bachelors of Divinity, which must answer Die Co he was stayed by the major part of the suffrages of the Doc

The truth is, there are some Heads amor are great abettors of M. Tournay, the party above mentio no doubt, are backed by others." -Letter from Ward of Sid June, 1634, to Archbishop Usher. Life by Parr, p. 470.

• Master Shelford hath of late affirmed in print, that the never yet defined to be the Antichrist by any Synode.Breviate, third edition, 1637, p. 308.

faculty.

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