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General TABLES for finding the Dominical or Sunday-Letter, and the

Places of the Golden Numbers in the Calendar.
TABLE I.

TABLE I.

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2

6

2

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5300 16

I

2

2

2500 26002800

|3300 3400 35001

3800 39001

4500 4600

14800 49005cools

5300 54005600

1630965001

3

3 6 5 4 3

Years of

Years of our Lord.

Our Lord B 1600 o B

5200 15 BC DE F G A

1700 I 1800

5400 17 1900

5500 | 17 1600 1700 1800 B

2000 2 B 3600 17 2100

5700 18 1900 2100 2200 2 300

12700

2200 3 5800 18 2000 2400

2300 4

5900 19 B 2400 3 B

6000 19 2900 3000 3100

13700

2500 4 3200

6100 19 3600

2600
5

6200 20 2700

6300 21 B 4300

2800

B 6400 20 4100 4200 4000 4500

2900

6500 1 3000 6

6600 3100

6700 23 B 3200

B 6800 22 4700 51001

15500
3300 7

6900 23 15200

3400 8

7000 24 3500 9

7100 24 B 3600 8 B

7200 24 3700

9 15700 5800159006100 6200

7300 25 600c 164001 3800 IO

7400 25 3900 IO

7500 26 B

400O IO B 7600, 26

4100 II 16600

7100 69007000

7700 26 7200 1730074001 4200 I 2

7800 27 4300 I 2 B

4400 I 2 B
7500
17900

18.300
4500 13

8100 28 8100 8200 7600 17700 7800 8000

18+col

4600
13

8200 29 4700 14

8300 29 B 4800

14
B

8400 29 8500l &c.

4900 14
5000 15

&c.

5100 16 To find the Dominical or Sunday. Letter tor any given year of our Lord, add to the year its fourth part, omitung fractious, and also the num er, which in Table I. ftandeth at the top of the column, wherein the number of hundreds contained in that given year is found : Divide the fum by 7, and if there is no remainder, then A is the Sunday-Letter: but if any number remaineth, then the letter which it andeth under that number at the top of the Table, is the Sunday-Letter.

TO tind the month and days of the month, to which the Golden Numbers ought to be pretixed in the Calendar, in any given year of our Lord, consisting of entire hundred years, and in all the intermediate years, beiwixt that and the next hundredth year following, look in the fecond column of table 11. for the given year, consisting of entire hundreds,

ad note the number ercypher which itands againit it in the third column; then, in Table I dok for the fame number in the column under any given Golden Number, which wlice you have found, guide your eye lideways to the left hand, and in the first column you will find the month and day, to which that Golden Number ought to be pretixed in the Calendar during that period of one hundred years.

Theleuter B prefixed to cercan liundredth years in Table II. denotes those years which ar till to be accounted Biflexiile or Leap-V'cars in the New Calendar; whereas all the urbier hundredth years are to be accounted only common years.

6700 16800

7900 / 28

8000 27

8500

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I 12 23

4,15 26

March 21 March 22 March 23 March 24 March 25

10121

с 819 cu 22 314251 017281 9 20
D

9:201|1223| 415201 718,29110 2 I 217 3:24 5 16:27
E
2113 -4

1627 8'19, C11 22 314.25 61728
F 11 22 314251 6117 281 9 20 11223 4152517,18|29
G 12 21 415261718 20/10,29 21324 51627 819 0
A 132-50527 819 01122 3 14.25 65728 9201
B 1425 017281 f0' 11223 415 26 718 29 10 21
C 15 26 71812910 21 213,24 516'27 819 OLI 22 3
D 1627 819 0122 31425 657 28 9201 1112 23 4
E 172819:0112 23 4 15,26 718.29 1027 21324 5

2

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March 311

I

2

F 18 29 1021 213124 s 1627 819 01122 314/23 6 April G 19 1122) 31425 01728 9 20 112 23 415 2017 April A

20 112 23 4115 26 71829 1021 213241 5116 27| 8 April B 21 2113124 51627 819 11 22 31425 01728 9 April 4

C 22 31425 6 27 28 9 20 11223/ 415261 7118 29.10 April 5

D 23 41526 718 29 1021 213 24 5 16/27 8:9 cu April 6 E 24 5|1627| 819 01122 311425 6171281 92 112 April 7

F 25 6117128 9201 I 12 23 415 26 71829 10211213 April 8 G 26 7118 29 10 2 1 21324 51627 819 011422 3.14 April 9

A 271 8 19 01122 3 1425 617|289120 112231415 April 10 B 28 9/20141212341526 718/29.1021 21:124 5.16 April 10

C 29 10 21 21324 516 27 829 0 11 22 311425 0117 April 12

D 011/22 31425 617'28 920 1 12/23 41526 718 April 13

E 112 231 415|26718 29 10 211 21324 510127 8119 April 14 F 21324 516 271 8191 1122 3 1425 017|28 9120

April 15

April 16

April 17
April 17

G
A
B
B
с

31425 617|28 9 20 112 23 41526 71829 1021
41526 7118 29 1021121324 51627 819) CU 22
51627 8 19 0111 22 314|256'17 28 9,20 1,1223

718 29 1021 2 1324 6|17|281 920 1-12 23 4 15|26

April 18

April 18 C 7118 29 10 211 21324' 5'16 271 819 011 22 31425

The Order for Morning and EVENING Prarer daily to

be said and used throughout the Year. TH "HE Morning and Evening Prayer shall be used in the

accustomed place of the Church, Chapel, or Chancel; except it shall be otherwise determined by the Ordinary of the Place. And the Chancels shall remain as they have done in times past.

And here is to be noted, That such Ornaments of the Church, and of the Ministers thereof, at all times of their Ministration, shall be retained, and be in use, as were in this Church of England by the Authority of Parliament in the second Year of the Reign of King Edward the Sixth.

Chancel] The churches were anciently divided into two parts; the body, called emphatically nave, (either from y205, a temple, or from navis, a ship; because under this image the Christian Church is aptiy represented ;) and the facrarium, or more holy part, since called the cancellum or chancel, from its being divided from the body by cancelli, or rails. The nave was common to all the people, and represented the visible world; the cancellum was appropriated to the priests and clerks, and typified heaven.

Second Year of Edward the Sixth] This Act of Parliament refers to the first Common Prayer-Book of Edward VI. for directions respecting the habits in which Ministers are to officiate. Thefe directions consist of two rubrics; one of them on the latt leaf of the book, prescribing the habits in all public ministrations whatsoever; and the other prescribing the habits to be used at the Communion, which is placed at the beginning of that office. The former runs ihus: “ In the faiyng or fyngyng of Matins and Even-song, baptizyng and burying, the Minister, in parishe churches, and chapelles annexed to the fame, shall use a furples; and in all cathedrall churches, and colleges, the archdeacones, deacones, provottes, mafters, prebendaries, and fellowes, beeyng graduates, maie use in the quire, besides their surplelles, suche hoodes as perteygneth to their feveral degrees which they have taken in anie Universitie withine this realme. But in all other places, every Minister Thalle bee at libertie to use a furpleile or no. It is also seemlie that graduates when thei doo preache Thould use such hoodes as perteygneth to their several degrees.

“And whenfoever the Bithoppe thall celebrate the holy Communion in the churche, or execute any other publique ministration, he shall have upon him, beside his rocket, a fur. plesie or aibe, and a cope or veitement, and also his paitoral staff in his hand, or else borne or holden by his chapelain."

The rubric respecting the attire of the Minister at the Communion is as follows:“Upon the daie, and at the tyme appoynted for the ministration of the holy Commu. nion, the prieit that thall execute the holy ministery, shall put upon him the vesture appointed for that miniftration; that is to laie, a white albe, plain, with a vestement of cope. And where there be many priestes, or deacons, there so many shall be ready to heipe the prielt in the miniftration as shall be requisite; and thall have upon them likewise the vertures appointed for their miniftery; that is to say, albes with tunicles."

N. B. The furplice, or super pelliceum, is so called from being worn over the other garments. The hood, caputium, or cucullus, has come down to us from the ancient Romans; being a coarse covering for the head, broad at one end, and gradually lessening to a point.' The rochette, a linenunder-garment, worn by bishops. The alb, a very ancient garment, worn at the celebration of the Communion, made of linen, and fitting the body closely, in the manner of a caffock. The cope, a coat without sleeves. The tuniche, 4 Tilk coat without neeves, like the cope, of a lky colour. The pastoral staff, crook, or arozier, uted by the Billiop as an emblem of his paltoral care over the flock of Christ.

FOR

Morning Prayer,

Daily throughout the Year,

Ezek. xviii. 27.

At the beginning of Morning Prayer, the Minister shall read with a loud voice fome one or more of these Sentences of the Scriptures that follow; and then be sball say

that which is written after the said Sentences. WHE

THEN the wicked man turneth away from his wick

edness that he hath committed, and doeth that which is lawful and right, he shall fave his soul alive.

I acknowledge my transgressions, and my fin is ever before me.-Pfal. li. 3.

Hide thy face from my sins, and blot out all mine iniquities.-Pfal. li. 9.

The Minister fball read with a loud voice) Previously to the Reformation, it was customary for both priest and people, before they commenced the offices of worship, to repeat secretly to themselves the Lord's-Prayer, Hail, Mary, and Creed. In celebrating mals, a great part of the service was (and is still in Roman Catholic countries) said in a low voice by the priest, according to one of the Miffal Rubrics, which expresses itself thus:Quæ vero fan&te, &c. “Those parts which are to be laid in the most folemn manner, the priest shall so pronounce, that he may hear his own voice, but that it may not be heard by the people.”-Rubricæ Generales Mifalis Romani.

The faid Sentences]. The services in the first book of King Edward VIth commence with the Lord's-Prayer. In the fubfequent review, however, the Reformers prefixed the Sentences, Exhortalin, Confellion, and Abfolution, as a proper introduction to the folemin duty which the worshipper was about to perform. Of the sentences, the general tendency is, to bring sinners to repentance; and they may be arranged under the following classes; ist, instruktion to the ignorant and erroneous; 1 John 1.8, 9; Ezekiel xviii. 27. 2dly, Admonition to the negligent and inconJistent ; Pfal. li. 3; Matt. iii. 2. zdly, Acknowledgment of sin, and deprecation of its confequences; Pfal. li. 9; Pfal. cxliii. 2; Luke xv, 18, 19. Athly, Consolation to the humble and penitent; Pfal.li. 17; Dan. ix. 3. 5thly, Caution against formality and Pharisaical hypocrisy'; Joel ii. 13.

The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.Pfal.li

. 17. Rend your hearts, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God; for he is gracious and merciful, flow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil.—Joel ii. 13.

To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgivenesses, though we have rebelled against him: neither have we obeyed the voice of the Lord our God, to walk in his laws which he set before us.-Dan. ix. 9, 10.

O Lord, correct me, but with judgment; not in thine anger, left thou bring me to nothing: Jer.x. 24; Pf. vi. 1.

Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. St. Matt. iij. 2.

I will arise, and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I havefinnedagainst heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy fon.—St. Luke xv. 18, 19.

Enter not into judgment with thy servant, O Lord: for in thy fight shall no man living be justified.-Pf.cxliii.g.

If we say that we have no fin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us; but if we confefs our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our fins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.—1 St. John i. 8, 9.

EARLY beloved brethren, the Scripture moveth us

in sundry places, to acknowledge and confefs our manifold fins and wickednefs; and that we should not diffemble nor cloak them before the face of Almighty God our heavenly Father; but confess them, with an humble, lowly, penitent, and obedient heart; to the end that we may obtain forgiveness of the same by his infinite goodness and mercy. And although we ought at all times humbly to acknowledge our sins before God, yet ought we most chiefly so to do, when we afsemble and meet together, to render thanks for the great benefits that we have received

D

Dearly beloved bretiren] The Exhortation properly follows the sentences, being partly deduced from, and intended to illustrate and apply them, and to direct us how to perform the confellion that follows them. It Thould therefore be read by the minifter in a folenin, deliberate, and imprellive manner, and littened to by the people with reverence and attention.

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